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White nationalism

The torch-wielding racists who marched on Charlottesville, Va., two years ago showed the ugly new face of the far right. Their deadly rally shocked the nation into paying attention to how racial hatred could turn into organized violence.

But if 2017 was the wake-up call, 2019 was the year the call was answered.

Senate Resolution Condemning White Supremacy Off To Rocky Start

Aug 18, 2019
Florida Senate seal
Wikimedia Commons

Senate Republican leaders say the first step toward preventing mass violence is condemning white nationalism and white supremacy as “hateful, dangerous and morally corrupt,” according to a draft resolution made public on Friday.

But Senate Democrats want to see the chamber do more. 

Senator Marco Rubio
Steve Newborn / WUSF Public Media

Florida U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio condemned white nationalism Tuesday in the wake of the mass shooting in Texas. It is being investigated as a federal hate crime.

During a trip to St. Petersburg, he compared the ideology to that of radical Muslim jihadis, saying both groups claim everyone else is evil and dangerous, and need to be "crushed."

Bill Galvano
NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

In the run-up to the 2020 legislative session, the Florida Senate will review acts of mass violence such as the deadly shootings this weekend in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, along with factors such as white nationalism.

Senate President Bill Galvano, R-Bradenton, on Monday directed Senate Infrastructure and Security Chairman Tom Lee, R-Thonotosassa, to lead efforts to determine if any further action is needed after laws were enacted in the wake of the Feb. 14, 2018 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

Updated 8:54pm E.T.

As New Zealand grapples with the aftermath of the attack on two Muslim congregations in Christchurch, the mass shootings on the other side of the world have struck fear through Muslim American communities and renewed calls for action against the rise of bigotry in the U.S.

Photo courtesy of Southern Poverty Law Center on Campus@USF

A University of South Florida student is speaking out about his past in the white nationalist movement.

Scott Ernest, an undergraduate student in public health at USF Tampa, said he first got involved in the movement online in 2004 and eventually moved to Montana to join a white nationalist organization. Now, Ernest advises young people who are thinking about leaving the alt-right, particularly those who are LGBT.