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Florida officials have condemned three more homes due to a Florida sinkhole, bringing the total to seven homes that are now unlivable.

USF Libraries Digital Heritage and Humanities Collections

When a large sinkhole opened in Land O’ Lakes last month and swallowed a pair of homes, Dr. Lori Collins first heard about it not on the news, but in text messages from her family.

Aimee Blodgett / USF

John F. Germany was remembered by a crowd of about 600 people at his funeral at St. John's Episcopal Church in Tampa Saturday.

The lawyer, judge and co-founder of the University of South Florida died last Wednesday at the age of 92.

The day before his funeral, university officials announced that the school had renamed a park just south of the USF Library as the "John F. Germany Legacy Park."

Dr. Garabet Moumdjian

One hundred years ago this week, what some call the Armenian Genocide began in the country now known as Turkey.

By 1918, at least one million Armenians were dead and many others were displaced by the Ottoman government.

Even today, the events are still shrouded in controversy, with many in Turkey saying what happened shouldn't be classified as a "genocide."

USF Library

A University of South Florida graduate who was one of the lawyers in a ground-breaking gay and lesbian rights case will speak at his alma mater Thursday night.

USF Oracle/ Courtesy Eileen Thornton, USF Library

Earlier this year, the University of South Florida Library bought two remote-controlled aerial drones for $1,500 apiece, with plans to lend them to students working on class projects.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Two days before the fall semester recently started at the University of South Florida, William Garrison was walking through the main Library on the Tampa campus.

As the Dean of USF Libraries, Garrison was nervous about the $1.5 million renovation project that had been done over the summer. Then two students walked past him.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

When I asked Matt Knight, the Coordinator of the University of South Florida Library Special and Digital Collections, how many pieces are held in the archives of the USF Tampa Library – I mean, individual pieces: every book, every oral history, every single piece of minutiae in the dozens of separate, smaller compilations, I got this reply:

"Boy, I wish you didn’t ask me that question - I am not sure, I mean, it’s just…" he said, his voice tailing off with an exasperated sigh.

That’s because the total is most likely in the hundreds of thousands, if not the low seven figures.

So Knight and his fellow Special Collections Librarians Andy Huse and Melanie Griffin really had their work cut out for them when they had to pick just some of those items to put on display for the public at a recent event called “A Few of Our Favorite Things.”

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

They're not raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, but the staff of USF Tampa Library's Special Collections is putting a few of their favorite things on display for the public for one day only.

According to Special Collections' librarian Andy Huse, the event, A Few of Our Favorite Things (Thursday, July 17 from 1-3 p.m.), allows he and his colleagues on the library's fourth floor to show off some of the most interesting objects, ranging from centuries-old spiritual texts and rare maps to Babylonian clay tablets and Victorian-era novels.


USF Library

UPDATE 9 a.m. 1/27: Andy Huse will give an encore presentation of  "Tampa's Rebels and Revolutionaries: Looking Beyond the Pirates and Gangsters" Tuesday, January 28, at noon in the USF Tampa Library's Grace Allen Room.

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ORIGINAL POST 3:45 p.m. 1/22: If you hear the phrase "Tampa outlaw" and think of the pirate José Gaspar or the gangsters Santo Trafficante, Sr., and his son, Santo Jr., Andy Huse would like you to think again.

The USF Special Collections librarian says that there's been other far more colorful renegades in Tampa's past that people don't know a lot about - and he'll talk about them Thursday night when he presents "Tampa's Rebels and Revolutionaries: Looking Beyond the Pirates and Gangsters" at the Florida Museum of Photographic Arts in downtown Tampa.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

The next time Florida legislators propose raising tuition or cutting budgets for higher education, members of the University of South Florida Student Government want to respond quickly.

So to make sure politicians in Tallahassee hear their concerns, student senators and other representatives were out on campus Tuesday signing up classmates for a "rapid response team" that can be put into action calling and emailing legislators when an issue arises.

Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF

The USF Tampa Library is going back to its round-the-clock hours Sunday through Thursday, perhaps as soon as next week, university officials say.   

'Club Lib’ No More As USF Shortens Library Hours

Aug 26, 2013
Yoselis Ramos

The Library at the USF Tampa campus has become known to students as "Club Lib" because of the late night hours.  Senior biomedical science/political science major Katharine Orr explains the library as the "hub" of campus. "Everyone is here all the time so it is like a club," she said.

Since the 2009-2010 school year, the campus library has been open 24 hours five days a week. But students starting classes today are facing shortened hours at "Club Lib" as the library is closing at midnight those days.

Courtesy of the Mahan Collection, Special Collections, USF Tampa Library

Dr. Charles Mahan, Professor and Dean Emeritus for the USF College of Public Health, has been collecting cartoons and cartoon-related memorabilia for sixty years.

In fact, he's already donated over thirty boxes of materials, including original Disney animation, to the USF Library's Special and Digital Collections. But in addition to Mickey Mouse, Mahan also loves political cartoons, collecting over eight thousand of them. 

“A good one tells you at a glance, sort of catches your imagination," said Mahan. "Maybe you say, ‘boy, that’s right on’ or maybe it makes you mad, but it makes you react.”

Now, with the continued help of the USF Library, a small portion of his vast portfolio is on display at the Tampa Museum of Art.