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A workaround by states to counter Trump administration cuts to Affordable Care Act subsidies has largely succeeded in protecting consumers from higher costs, California and 17 other states said.

A Florida man has pleaded guilty to threatening to burn down a Muslim family's new home.

More Than 100 Charged In Florida In Health Care Fraud

Jun 23, 2016

In what the U.S. Department of Justice described as an "unprecedented nationwide sweep," more than 100 people in Florida have been charged with crimes related to Medicare and Medicaid fraud, the federal agency announced Wednesday. 

As a nationwide investigation of hundreds of hospitals by the U.S. Department of Justice wraps up, two more South Florida hospitals are among those settling False Claims Act charges.

Seven hospitals in Florida have agreed to pay the federal government about $9 million to settle allegations they submitted false claims to Medicare for a minimally-invasive procedure commonly used to treat spinal fractures from osteoporosis, a news release from the U.S. Department of Justice says.

The Justice Department said Friday that it had reached settlements totaling more than $250 million with hundreds of hospitals where doctors implanted cardiac devices in violation of Medicare coverage requirements.

MDSHA W8-72

 The Ybor City campus of Hillsborough Community College will have special guests this evening. Tonight, the Federal Department of Justice’s C.O.P.S. Office, or Community Oriented Policing Services, will be holding a community listening session to listen to people concerned about the Tampa Police Department’s bike policing strategies.

Katy Hennig / USF News

Florida Senator Bill Nelson has asked the Department of Justice - and not Florida law enforcement officials - to open an investigation into the Dozier School for Boys.

In 2009, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement concluded there was no criminal wrongdoing at the now closed Marianna reform school, despite decades of allegations of abuse of students by school officials.

Hundreds of inmate deaths with questionable circumstances have sparked a potential federal investigation into the state's corrections system.

The U.S. Department of Justice has notified state authorities it will look into potential abuses of inmates after 320 people died behind bars in Florida this year - the highest number of inmate deaths on record.

At the same time, there's been a doubling of incidents involving the use of force by corrections officers.

When teachers ask this fall, “What did you do on your summer vacation?”  nearly four dozen Tampa teenagers will answer, “I spent it at the James A. Haley VA Hospital.”

For more than a decade, Haley has been operating a summer Youth Volunteer program that gives teenagers insight into health care careers while at the same time helping veterans.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF

University of South Florida researchers are scheduled to begin exhuming human remains on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys this weekend. Now comes word that they'll be getting some assistance from federal authorities.

The U.S. Department of Justice is giving the researchers, led by Dr. Erin Kimmerle, $423,528 in federal grant money to help conduct their search of unmarked graves in the now-closed reform school.

The funds come from a DOJ National Institute of Justice grant for universities and other non-profit organizations that use DNA technology to identify missing persons. The researchers have taken DNA samples from a number of living relatives of boys who died decades ago at Dozier, some under mysterious circumstances.

justice.gov

Robert E. O' Neill, U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Florida, announced Thursday morning that he plans to resign this summer. He's leaving his post to take a job with the Freeh Group International Solutions, a global risk management firm with corporate offices in Washington, DC, New York and Wilmington, Del.

 In 2010, O'Neill was an assistant U.S. attorney based in Tampa when President Barack Obama recruited him for his current job. The U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Florida is the top prosecutor for more than half of the state, including Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa and Fort Myers. It's one of the busiest such offices in the country. 

Here's the text of O'Neill's resignation statement, as posted on the United States Department of Justice website: