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U.S. citizenship

The Supreme Court will decide this month whether the Trump administration can include a question about citizenship on the 2020 Census, and Florida Republican Congressman Greg Steube says he believes the court will decide to include the controversial query.

Rep. Steube of Florida’s 17th congressional district, the Sarasota area, said Friday on The Florida Roundup that opposition to the citizenship question amounts to "a lot of Democratic political posturing."

Later this month, the Supreme Court is expected to decide a brewing fight over the 2020 Census. It has to do with a proposed citizenship question the Trump administration wants to place on the Census.

We spent the full hour taking a closer look at what this might mean for Florida. Our guests for the discussion were:

From 2009 to 2016, the Defense Department recruited more than 10,000 non-citizens into the armed forces. Now some say they're being discharged without explanation.

An American flag blows in the wind.
Wikimedia Commons

The day before the Fourth of July weekend, more than 100 immigrants officially became U.S. citizens at a ceremony in Tampa.

M.S. Butler

Refugees flee their homes out of fear, violence or persecution.

Like Manael Ibrahim.  She fled the war in Iraq in 2002 for safety in Jordan. But after being denied permanent asylum in Jordan she and her family came to the United States, and to Tampa.

"I never imagined that it can happen and I'd be a American, you know. It's really great," said Ibrahim.

USF Muma College of Business

The dean of the USF Muma College of Business and his wife celebrated Valentine's Day a day early by becoming American citizens last Friday.