LISTEN LIVE

Technology

The Apollo program was gigantic.

The U.S. government spent roughly $26 billion (about $260 billion in today's dollars, according to one estimate) between 1960 and 1972 to hire contractors and subcontractors who employed hundreds of thousands of people to create and improve on technology that led us to the moon and back.

A man stands in front of a biometric face scanner.
Tampa International Airport

By Carrie Pinkard

There could be a day in the future where people won’t need to shuffle through boarding passes and passports to get on a plane.

All they would need is their face.

Tampa International Airport may be heading in that direction with their biometric facial scanner pilot program.

To keep up with potential adversaries such as China, the Pentagon is teaming with civilian technological innovators and trying to adopt some of the practices of the private sector.

Ex Labs / Facebook

For some students at University of South Florida St Petersburg, there’s no such thing as taking a break.

Twenty students are currently participating in the Ex Labs business boot camp instead of relaxing over the school’s spring holiday.

Florida House lawmakers are moving forward with a plan to revamp the state’s information technology system.

TechData

Tampa Bay's largest public company, Tech Data Corp., is buying Phoenix-based technology distributor, Avnet Technology Solutions, under a $2.6 billion deal.

Port Tampa Bay

The hardest part of getting a business off the ground is finding resources and money.

Downtown Tampa will become a hub for creators and investors to meet starting Monday, February 8. The goal is to make launching a startup easier in the Bay area.

Tampa Bay Startup Week will host workshops, panels and networking events centered on entrepreneurship. 

stanfordtech / Flickr

Last week the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development released the results of a global study looking at the effect of technology on 15-year-olds test scores.

The group oversees one of the most important international exams, so their research matters.

Michael S. Butler / WUSF News

At Clearwater Marine Aquarium on Thursday mechanical engineers, aerospace engineers and movie stars teamed up, all to improve the life of a  California girl.

Dominique Courbin and Michael Gonzalez are part of the team from the University of Central Florida trying to beat the clock to get their latest project ready for 10-year-old Annika Emmert.

 Courbin is concentrating on getting everything just right.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Ocoee High School just west of Orlando opened less than a decade ago. But technology-wise, the 2,300-student school is already obsolete.

Ocoee is part of $14 million project to outfit seven Orange County schools with fast, wireless Internet and new classroom technology.

The first step was ripping out and replacing miles of fiber optic cable and adding devices teachers could use with their lessons.

Orange County schools’ infrastructure director Thomas McNabb walked through a science classroom, pointing out the changes.

When you sit down at Chef José Andrés' tapas restaurant, Jaleo, in Washington, D.C., and ask to see the beverage options, as I did recently, you're in for a surprise. Instead of a traditional leather-bound menu, I was handed an iPad.

Reading teacher Audra Cervi says kids pay attention to their reading lesson when the letter ‘J’ turns into a jumping, blue 3-D jaguar.

Cervi places a flash card with the letter J under a special camera. Across the room a jaguar springs to life on an electronic screen.

A small group of kindergartners at Audubon Park Elementary School near Orlando squeal at the sight. Some reach out to grab the critter.