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Amendment 3 Foes Pour Money Into Ballot Fight

Oct 29, 2018

A political committee raised $7.75 million during a week-long period as it tries to defeat a proposed constitutional amendment that could make it harder to expand gambling in Florida, according to a newly filed finance report. 

The words on the November ballot appear simple enough: “Voter Control of Gambling in Florida.”

Disney and The Seminole Tribe of Florida keep pouring money into a campaign to limit future casino gambling.

Gambling in Florida is a perennial issue for politicians and the public. It will be on this fall’s ballot for voters in two forms. One proposed constitutional amendment would ban greyhound racing. The other question is much larger: should voters have the exclusive right to expand gambling? If approved by at least 60 percent of voters, it would take that power away from state lawmakers.

New Committee Raises Money To Fight Gambling Measure

Aug 20, 2018

A political committee formed last month has raised $1.25 million to help fight a proposed constitutional amendment that could make it harder to expand gambling in the state.

The committee, Citizens for the Truth About Amendment 3, Inc., filed paperwork with the state July 18 and raised the money from Aug. 1 through Aug. 7.

Contributions included $500,000 from Jacksonville Greyhound Racing, Inc., a Northeast Florida gambling operator, and $250,000 from Fontainebleau Florida Hotel, LLC of Miami Beach, according to campaign-finance reports.

Disney, Seminoles Sink $10 Million Into Gambling Fight

Aug 13, 2018

Disney Worldwide Services, Inc. and the Seminole Tribe of Florida continue upping the ante as they try to pass a constitutional amendment that could make it harder to expand gambling in the state. 

The Seminole Tribe of Florida plans to eliminate plastic straws at its six casinos in the state.

In a major escalation of their support, Disney Worldwide Services and the Seminole Tribe of Florida each plowed $5 million last month into a proposed constitutional amendment that would make it harder to expand gambling in the state. 

Florida is appealing a ruling that allowed the Seminole Tribe of Florida to keep blackjack at its well-known casinos in the state.

Senate President Wants Gambling Deal With Seminole Tribe

Nov 22, 2016
Seminole Tribe

Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, said Tuesday he hopes to reach a new gambling deal with the Seminole Tribe of Florida, pointing in part to potential revenues for the state.

U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle this month ruled in favor of the tribe in a legal battle with the state about offering blackjack and other "banked" card games at tribal casinos. Hinkle ruled that the tribe can continue to offer the games, despite the expiration last year of part of a gambling deal known as a "compact."

The state of Florida is asking a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit filed by the Seminole Tribe.

The Seminole Tribe of Florida is advocating to save a small island off the mouth of Tampa Bay from eroding.

The island represents a painful moment in the Tribe’s history. It was used as a deportation site in the mid-19th century. 

Gov. Rick Scott's staff nearly reached a multi-billion dollar deal with the Seminole Indian tribe that would have allowed it to add roulette and craps at its South Florida casinos, documents obtained by The Associated Press show.

The deal, which was scuttled last spring amid resistance from state legislators, also would have opened the door for the Seminoles to build a casino in the Fort Pierce area and would likely have blocked construction of any Las Vegas-style casinos in Miami for the next seven years.