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Robert Mueller

Updated at 5:33 p.m. ET

House Democrats won an important victory in federal court on Friday when a judge ordered the Justice Department to surrender now-secret material from the Russia investigation — and, more broadly, validated the impeachment inquiry into President Trump.

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A growing number of Democrats in Congress are calling for the impeachment of President Trump, following former Special Counsel Robert Mueller's testimony last week. But St. Petersburg Congressman Charlie Crist is taking a more cautious line.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

Former special counsel Robert Mueller on Wednesday dismissed President Donald Trump's claims that his investigation had exonerated the president of obstructing his probe into Russia's efforts to help Trump win the 2016 election.

"The president was not exculpated for the acts that he allegedly committed," Mueller declared at the opening of congressional hearings into his investigation.

Former special counsel Robert Mueller is appearing in two separate hearings before the House judiciary and intelligence committees.
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Former special counsel Robert Mueller is appearing in two separate hearings before the House judiciary and intelligence committees. Though Mueller has said his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election is his testimony, lawmakers have insisted that he testify in person. Watch the proceedings live.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller
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Former special counsel Robert Mueller is testifying before Congress on Wednesday, and lawmakers have so many questions they may not have enough time to ask them all.

The House judiciary and intelligence committees have scheduled hearings for 8:30 a.m. and noon.

Updated at 1:14 p.m. ET

Special counsel Robert Mueller stepped down Wednesday after concluding not only one of the highest-profile investigations in recent history, but one of the most distinctive codas in the career of any top Washington official.

Mueller addressed reporters at the Justice Department in his first public statement since taking over the Russia investigation, ending two years of near-silence even under one of the hottest spotlights ever to burn on a public figure.

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Special counsel Robert Mueller is making a statement about his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Watch his remarks at the Justice Department live.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller
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Attorney General William Barr has released a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference to Congress and the public.

Read the full report here.

Attorney General William Barr has released a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election to Congress and the public.

The special counsel spent nearly two years investigating attacks on the 2016 presidential election and whether the Trump campaign coordinated with the Russians behind it.

Updated at 7:24 p.m. ET

When President Trump learned two years ago that a special counsel had been appointed to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election, he was distraught.

Trump "slumped back in his chair and said, 'Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I'm f***ed,' " according to the report by special counsel Robert Mueller that was released Thursday in redacted form.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Attorney General William Barr delivers a press conference at the Justice Department ahead of the expected release of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. 

Democrats in Congress and an overwhelming majority of the American public are eagerly awaiting the expected release this week of the Mueller report.

Leaders of the Justice Department have sent a summary of Robert Mueller's main findings to key members of Congress. The special counsel's office completed its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election on Friday.

Robert Mueller may have completed his report, but other investigations into President Trump are expected to carry on for months.

There are, broadly, two kinds: those being undertaken from within the executive branch and those being run by members of Congress — mostly Democrats in control of major committees in the House.

Updated at 7:46 p.m. ET

Attorney General William Barr received a report on Friday by special counsel Robert Mueller about the findings from Mueller's investigation into the Russian attack on the 2016 presidential election.

President Trump’s former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen is on Capitol Hill Tuesday, speaking behind closed doors. He will publicly testify Wednesday in a highly anticipated hearing, before his three-year prison term begins in May.

Cohen has pleaded guilty to a number of crimes including campaign finance violations connected to hush money payments to women who say they had affairs with Trump before the 2016 election.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker vowed Friday that he hasn't interfered in any way with the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Whitaker also told the House Judiciary Committee that although he's been briefed about the work of special counsel Robert Mueller, he has been the "endpoint" for all the information he's gotten and he hasn't discussed it with anyone at the White House.

Updated at 5:24 p.m. ET

The double-jeopardy clause of the Constitution says a person can't be prosecuted twice for the same crime.

But, in fact, for 170 years, the Supreme Court has said that separate sovereigns — state and federal governments — can do just that, because each sovereign government has separate laws and interests.

Northwest Florida Congressman Matt Gaetz is among those calling for the firing or resignation of FBI Special Counsel Robert Mueller. He’s investigating Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential Election. Now some of Florida’s gubernatorial candidates are jumping into the fray.