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police reform

In a survey of Americans' attitudes toward law enforcement, two-thirds of respondents said that individual officers should be held legally accountable for using excessive force, but few of those polled said they would support cutting police budgets.

Police Chief Anthony Holloway stands at a podium with Mayor Rick Kriseman next to him.
St. Petersburg Police Department

In response to multiple demands for reform, including flyers posted downtown during fourth of July weekend by the St. Pete Peace Protest movement, St. Petersburg is "re-imagining" the city’s police force and its role in responding to social service calls.

Updated July 10, 6 p.m. with additional comments from the St. Pete Peace Protest movement.

Clay County Sheriff Darryl Daniels with other deputies pose during a video
CLAY COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE/YOUTUBE

Facing a tough reelection campaign, Clay County Sheriff Darryl Daniels has released a new video where he stands in uniform with more than a dozen other members of the department, saying while his department will protect “your constitutional rights” for a peaceful protest or march, that lawlessness will not be tolerated.

Hillsborough County NAACP President Yvette Lewis speaks at a press conference, joined by county law enforcement leaders and the Florida ACLU.
Bradley George/WUSF

The Hillsborough County NAACP and the county’s law enforcement agencies say they’re ready to work together on police reform.

At least two-thirds of American high school students attend a school with a police officer, according to the Urban Institute, and that proportion is higher for students of color. Now, the national uprising for racial justice has led to a push to remove police officers from security positions inside schools.

woman at podium next to a sign language interpreter
CITY OF TAMPA/FACEBOOK

Saying all police departments need to evolve to serve their communities better, Tampa Mayor Jane Castor on Friday announced the creation of a task force to recommend changes in city police policy and practice.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans unveiled legislation on Wednesday to address a national outcry for reform of the country's law enforcement departments, with hopes of acting on police misconduct, dangerous practices and concerns of systemic racism.

But Democrats say the proposal, which would encourage police departments to end such practices such as chokeholds and no-knock warrants but does not explicitly ban them, falls short.

Updated at 7:58 p.m. ET

The Republican-led Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday held its first hearing on policing since the May 25 death of George Floyd — a black man who was killed in custody by Minneapolis police — triggered a wave of protests and international outcry for reform of the U.S. police system.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday encouraging police departments to improve training — a step critics say falls short of what is needed to curb police officers' use of force against nonwhites.

The order comes as the president faces tremendous pressure to take action following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police last month.

In the wake of George Floyd's death, a flashpoint in the debates over police reform has been the push to ban chokeholds nationwide. Advocates believe that enshrining a ban into law will deter police violence.

And it's gaining traction. Congressional Democrats have proposed a legislative package that calls for a ban on all neck restraints. President Trump, though he stopped short of full support of a ban, said late last week that police should avoid using chokeholds. And the state of New York passed a law banning the tactic.