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open enrollment

Kathy Castor (center) poses with a members of  Florida Covering Kids and Families and the Childrens Board of Hillsborough County.
Delaney Brown / WUSF Public Media

People shopping for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act have more options than ever - but one lawmaker is warning that not all plans promise equal coverage.

It's the season to roll up your sleeves, gather your documents, and pick a health insurance plan for 2020. For those shopping for their own plans, HealthCare.gov and the other state exchanges are open for enrollment as of November 1.

With open enrollment ending next week, the government says sign-ups for coverage under former President Barack Obama's health care law are lagging when compared with last year.

It's open enrollment season for people who buy their health insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplaces. After a series of repeal efforts and back-and-forth on the so-called Obamacare at the federal level, there's a lot of confusion to sort out.

Health News Florida has pulled together a Q&A to help you navigate your health insurance shopping experience:

Q: Do we still have to buy insurance?

A: There's no longer a penalty for going without insurance. But let's back up here a little.

healthcare.gov

There's less than a month left to enroll for health insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace and so far this year fewer people have been signing up.

A strawberry blonde hair woman helps a brunette woman sign up for health insurance on a laptop.
Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

Open enrollment for health insurance plans in the Affordable Care Act marketplace for 2019 coverage started Thursday and consumers will have less help navigating several changes that were put in place.

Christie Hyde DeNave/Florida Blue

About 1.6 million Floridians are enrolled in Affordable Care Act Marketplace plans.

Open enrollment starts Nov. 1 and ends Dec. 15. Florida Blue offers plans in all 67 Florida counties, and covers more than half of enrollees.

Open Enrollment For Medicare Has Begun

Oct 16, 2018

People ages 65 and older and those with qualifying disabilities have until December 7 to choose between Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage which is sold by private insurers.

More than 700,000 Floridians selected or were automatically re-enrolled in Obamacare plans during the final week of regular enrollment, bringing the state’s six-week enrollment total to 1.73 million.

This year is six weeks shorter than last year.

Not on the calendar, or course, but there are six fewer weeks this year for people getting their health insurance through the Affordable Care Act -- otherwise known as Obamacare or ACA-- to sign up for 2018.

Obamacare enrollment is off to a strong start in Florida and around the nation, according to national data and those who help people sign up for health insurance.

The 2018 annual open-enrollment period for coverage on the health insurance marketplaces starts Wednesday. But if you don’t take care of lingering issues from your past coverage, they may come back to haunt you when you try to sign up this fall.

Unpaid Premiums

New rules will allow some insurers to require you to pay any back premiums you owe for the 12 months prior to the effective date of your new coverage.

The federal government is expanding the length of the open enrollment period for Medicare and Obamacare health insurance policies in Florida and other states impacted by disaster.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell visited Tampa on Tuesday to remind Floridians they’re in the final days to enroll in the federal marketplace for health insurance.

  

Open enrollment on HealthCare.gov started Sunday, and federal health officials expect the third year of open enrollment to be more challenging than in previous years.

It's open enrollment time for many people who have health insurance through their job, and Florida’s state employees are among those who are thinking about making changes to their plans.

Several million Americans hit with new federal fines for going without health insurance are getting a second chance to sign up, and that could ease the sting of rising penalties for being uninsured.

But as the enrollment window reopened on Sunday in Florida and the 36 other states that use the federal health insurance marketplace at HealthCare.gov, it’s unclear how many know about the time-limited opportunity, let alone will take advantage of it.

Just a handful of Florida Medicare Advantage plans offered for 2015 received below average scores in a federal quality rating system, a breakdown of data by Avalere Health shows.

It's open enrollment season for Medicare, the time when beneficiaries can switch plans if they want. Plenty of private insurance companies are competing to enroll them in Medicare Advantage plans.

If you have Medicare, or you're getting close to age 65, your mailbox is likely overflowing with offers. The ads are coming at you on TV, too. 

The trial began today for the white Florida man accused of shooting and killing an unarmed black teen in November 2012, raising comparisons to the Trayvon Martin case.

Michael Dunn pulled into a Jacksonville gas station and parked next to the SUV in which 17-year-old Jordan Davis was sitting in with three friends. The 47-year-old software developer from Satellite Beach was waiting for his fiancée to return from the convenience store when he told the teens to turn their music down.

Today, Oct. 15, is the first day of open enrollment for Medicare beneficiaries to choose their drug plan and HMO-style Medicare Advantage plan for 2014.  They can save money if they do some research, but if they don't, most will pay more this year. 

Researchers on Medicare enrollment predict that millions of beneficiaries will remain in their current plan rather than hassle with doing the research to see what has changed. And that would be a mistake, since so many plans are switching the drugs they cover or the premiums and co-pays they charge.