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New York Times

The Citrus County Board of Commissioners made their final decision Tuesday, rejecting a request by the county’s public library system for an online subscription of the New York Times by a 3-2 vote.

The issue attracted national attention after one commissioner called the newspaper “fake news" during its meeting a month ago.

A small Florida county jumped into the ongoing fight between President Trump and the media this week when its county commission's dissing of the New York Times made national headlines.

The Citrus County Commission will discuss whether to pay for a digital subscription to the New York Times, weeks after some commissioners voiced opposition to the plan, calling the paper "fake news."

Citrus County commissioners will not allow its public libraries to carry digital subscriptions to the New York Times because some said the newspaper prints "fake news."

Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

NBC Nightly News Anchor Lester Holt and former New York Times Publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. were in St. Petersburg on Saturday, receiving awards for their decades-long careers in journalism.

President Trump on Sunday intensified his assaults on media organizations that cover him and his administration, dismissing them as unpatriotic and irresponsible.

The attacks followed a tweet from the president in which he revealed that he had met the publisher of The New York Times, A.G. Sulzberger, and outlined some details of their conversation.

Trump tweeted that the two discussed "the vast amounts of Fake News being put out by the media & how that Fake News has morphed into phrase, "Enemy of the People." Sad!"

Updated at 11:39 a.m.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and his son Jeb Bush Jr. have responded to a news report that the likely Republican presidential candidate self-identified as Hispanic in a 2009 voter-registration application.

FSU Counters Bad Ink

Jan 12, 2015

Florida State University officials say they’re pushing back against recent bashing in the national media. Top administrators are developing a strategic marketing campaign to polish the school’s image.

Board of Trustees Chairman Allan Bense said he’s ready to send fellow trustees, armed with positive talking points, on speaking tours to spread the good news.

“I think it’s time for us to tell the world about how great FSU is. We’ve taken a few shots. I get it. I understand that," Bense said.

Hedrick Smith

Who stole the American Dream?  That's the title of Pulitzer-Prize winning reporter Hedrick Smith's latest book.

The man who helped publish the Pentagon Papers is making several Florida appearances to talk about his investigation of the American economy and public policy.

He spoke Monday at St. Petersburg College Seminole, and will appear at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at New College in Sarasota and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6 at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Making Sense of Internet Comment Sections

Jun 26, 2014

Are internet comments sections the new town square, or cesspools of racism, sexism and worse?

Whenever you scroll down through a comments section, at some point you encounter something that makes you cringe.

Can these often offensive comments sections be improved without cutting off free speech?

"It's definitely problematic and if we're going to make the internet work as a form of communication, we have got to figure this out," said Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute's Sense-making Project.

WUSF Public Media

New York Times Columnist Maureen Dowd was in the state of Colorado a while back, a state that has legalized the recreational use of marijuana.

She decided to eat a couple of bites of a marijuana-infused chocolate bar as she sat in her hotel room.

And now she's written about the experience -- which was not a good one.

Making Sense of The New York Times' Editor Firing

May 23, 2014
A.P.

In the newspaper business, editors are not particularly loved.

In fact, they have long had a reputation for being tough, hard-headed and difficult to work with.

Yet, that's exactly the reputation Jill Abramson had as the first female editor of The New York Times.

And, being tough to work with was reportedly one of the reasons she was fired.

Making Sense of Online Quizzes

Mar 21, 2014
buzzfeed.com

So which super power should you have? Which U.S. President are you?  Which member of the House Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines and Hazardous Materials are you?

Seriously, there's actually a quiz for all of those questions on the internet.

There's no real answer as to why anyone would actually want to know these things, but Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute's "Sense-Making Project" does have some answers about why there are all these online quizzes.