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NCAA

The NCAA is clearing the way for college football, men's basketball and women's basketball to resume on-campus activities on June 1, even as universities map out how they might return to a new normal during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many schools are also facing a sharp drop in revenue that would be made far worse if the upcoming college football season is canceled.

In a significant shift for college sports, the NCAA's top governing body said it supports a rule change allowing student-athletes to profit from their name, image and likeness, so long as the college or university they attend does not pay them directly.

The shock of the NCAA canceling college sports largely is gone.

The cost, is not.

Normally, right now, much of this country would be consumed by March Madness.

GOVERNOR'S PRESS OFFICE

Gov. Ron DeSantis will get a chance to let athletes at Florida colleges do something he couldn’t do while playing baseball at Yale: make money off the field from their names and images.

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

The NCAA has announced that it is canceling its Division I men's and women's college basketball tournaments. This year, there will be no March Madness.

"This decision is based on the evolving COVID-19 public health threat, our ability to ensure the events do not contribute to spread of the pandemic, and the impracticality of hosting such events at any time during this academic year given ongoing decisions by other entities," the NCAA said in a statement Thursday.

Thomas Iacobucci/WUSF Public Media

NCAA Division I Men’s and Women’s Basketball Tournament games, including those next week at Amalie Arena, will not be played in front of fans due to concerns over coronavirus.

Billboard and parking garage of Raymond James Stadium
Carl Lisciandrello / WUSF Public Media

With 18 cases confirmed in Florida, COVID-19 is beginning to impact major events statewide. Miami cancelled the Ultra Music Festival in response and other large gatherings are also being scrapped.

Florida lawmakers are working on a plan to allow college athletes to earn money for their name, image and likeness. The move comes after California created a path for college athletes to be compensated, forcing the NCAA to consider making changes. Now with a week left in session, lawmakers in the Senate are questioning whether any potential loopholes in the bill would give universities an advantage in recruiting.

The Florida Senate is moving its version of a plan allowing college athletes to receive pay for their name, image and likeness. Florida is trying to follow California, which passed a law allowing student athletes to earn money from endorsements.

NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

Strip clubs, casinos, breweries and cigarette makers could be benched from a proposal that would let Florida college athletes market themselves off the field.

Tampa is in position to host its fourth NCAA Women’s Final Four.

The NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Committee announced Monday that Tampa is a finalist for the tournament in 2025 and 2026.

Athletes at Florida universities and colleges would get a “bill of rights” guaranteeing financial aid and health coverage as part of a House draft proposal intended to allow athletes to cash in on their names and images.

Florida is among the states looking to force the issue of athlete pay on the NCAA. California passed a law to do so last year. Three House committees held a joint meeting on the subject Monday.

House Speaker Jose Oliva offered support Tuesday to lawmakers who want Florida’s college athletes to be able to cash in on their names and images, as three influential House committees prepare to jointly discuss the issue next week.

Sen. Randolph Bracy wants to expand the playing field on proposals that would allow college athletes in Florida to get paid for endorsements.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association announcement on student-athlete compensation Tuesday came after years of pressure from the athletes, lawyers and politicians. But critics of the change warn that it might not provide much fairness.

Carl Lisciandrello / WUSF Public Media

The NCAA Board of Governors took the first step Tuesday toward allowing athletes to cash in on their fame, voting unanimously to clear the way for the amateur athletes to "benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness."

Gov. Ron DeSantis
GOVERNOR'S PRESS OFFICE

Gov. Ron DeSantis, who captained his university’s baseball team, backed California-style legislation Thursday that would allow Florida college athletes to cash in on their names and images.

Following California’s lead, Florida recently became the second state to introduce legislation pushing to allow collegiate athletes to profit from their name and likeness. Ryan Dailey spoke with House Minority Leader Kionne McGhee, who filed a bill to do just that – and it’s got the attention of much of the sports world.

This week we took a closer look at what President Donald Trump wants to do with Medicare, and how it could affect the millions of Floridians who count on it for health care, with:

House Minority Leader Kionne McGhee wants college student-athletes in Florida to be able to cash in on their names and images, similar to a measure that California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Monday.

Defying the NCAA, California's governor signed a first-in-the-nation law Monday that will let college athletes hire agents and make money from endorsements — a move that could upend amateur sports in the U.S. and trigger a legal challenge.

WUSF/Bradley George

More than 20,000 people packed Amalie Arena Sunday night as Baylor beat Notre Dame to become the new champions in Division I women's basketball.

USF Athletics

The University of South Florida women's basketball team is once again playing in the NCAA Tournament, but there's some disappointment with the circumstances.

USF Athletics

College football announced its slate of bowl games Sunday, and the University of South Florida Bulls are once again Alabama-bound, as they will be playing in the Birmingham Bowl for the second year in a row.

This time, the Bulls (9-2, 6-2 American Conference) will take on Texas Tech Red Raiders (6-6, 3-6 Big 12) on Saturday, December 23 at noon.

Across the country, people have an estimated $10 billion  riding on the outcome of the men’s NCAA basketball championship.

Only a tiny part of that is being done legally, roughly 3 percent, according to the American Gaming Association. And while some states’ gambling laws are a bit gray, Florida’s gambling laws don’t leave a lot of questions on the matter.

GoUSFBulls.com

Just three weeks after hiring new head football coach Charlie Strong, the University of South Florida has fired men's basketball coach, Orlando Antigua.

Antigua was hired in 2014 with much fanfare due to his success recruiting star players as an assistant coach at the University of Kentucky.

John Kersten (USF)

The University of South Florida men's basketball program is under NCAA investigation for possible academic fraud issues.

Moffitt Cancer Center

When the NCAA Women's Final Four comes to town, cancer researchers benefit. 

Since 2009, the Kay Yow Cancer Fund has awarded a women's cancer research grant to a research institution in the city hosting the NCAA Women's Final Four

Monday, Moffitt Cancer Center Professor of Oncology and Medicine Dr. Martine Extermann received the $250,000 grant.

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