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Tim Fanning / WUSF Public Media

The Tampa Bay Rays are celebrating two decades of baseball this upcoming season, and the team is embracing its past while thinking positively about the future.

On Wednesday, Rays leaders touted a new 20th anniversary logo and other plans to celebrate the occasion. But absent was mention of the team’s future in St. Petersburg, the loss of star players like Evan Longoria, and poor fan attendance.

Provided to WUSF News

The Atlanta Braves could soon spend a few months of the year in southern Sarasota County if officials have their way.

Sarasota County Administrator Tom Harmer sent an email to Sarasota County Commissioners Monday informing them about a proposal to bring the team to North Port for spring training. The West Village Improvement District made the bid for the team.

History was made in Baltimore today: The Orioles played in what the league says is the first Major League Baseball game to be closed to the public.

That meant that players came on the field to no cheers and a home run was marked by the crack of a bat and only a few isolated claps.

Here's video of the first pitch:

And video of a three-run home run by Orioles first-baseman Chris Davis:

NPR's Don Gonyea is at Camden Yards this afternoon and he reports that he saw just a small amount of police presence outside the stadium.

AP

 Tickets are on sale to the public for the Tampa Bay Rays three-game series this weekend against the Baltimore Orioles.

The series was originally scheduled for Oriole Park at Camden Yards, but has been relocated to Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg due to protests and violence in Baltimore. 

The streets of Baltimore were quieter Tuesday night, a day after vandalism and rioting forced officials to implement a curfew. Today, the Orioles plan to play an MLB game without an audience, and a woman who yanked her son away from potential trouble is making headlines.

Baseball super star Alex Rodriguez dropped a federal lawsuit against Major League Baseball and its players union that challenged a 162-game suspension.

The federal lawsuit was the Yankees third baseman's last chance at trying to overturn the unprecedented punishment handed down by the league over allegations that Rodriguez used performance-enhancing drugs and then tried to scuttle an investigation into his use of the drugs.

Baseball superstar Alex Rodriguez is suing Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association in federal court, trying to overturn a 162-game suspension.

The judge hearing the complaint also agreed to allow the Yankees third baseman and his lawyers to release an unredacted version of the decision handed down by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz.

ESPN reports:

NEW YORK — Major League Baseball’s key witness in its case against Alex Rodriguez said he designed and administered an elaborate doping program for the 14-time All-Star starting in 2010. 

Anthony Bosch, the founder of the now shuttered Florida anti-aging clinic, Biogenesis, said in a “60 Minutes” interview aired on CBS on Sunday night that Rodriguez paid him $12,000 per month to provide him with an assortment of banned drugs that included testosterone and human growth hormone.

Alex Rodriguez, one of baseball's biggest stars and its highest-paid player, should be suspended for the 2014 season and postseason, an independent arbitrator decided on Saturday.

Fredric Horowitz, who heard Rodriguez's appeal of Major League Baseball's 211-game suspension, upheld most of the punishment handed down by the league.

(We most recently updated this post at 6:48 p.m. ET.)

New York Yankees' slugger Alex Rodriguez, one of baseball's brightest stars and its highest-paid player, will be suspended through the 2014 regular season because he violated parts of baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program, the league said today.

According to several news reports, Major League Baseball has given the players union a list of those facing suspensions because of doping.

In truth, this is another pit stop in the long march toward what is rumored to be the suspension of some of baseball's A-listers. Of course, the biggest target is rumored to be Alex Rodriguez.

Miami-Dade Police Department

Milwaukee Brewers slugger Ryan Braun has been suspended for the rest of the season for the use of performance-enhancing drugs he reportedly obtained at Biogenesis, a now-defunct Coral Gables "anti-aging" clinic, ESPN.com reports

Polk County commissioners approved Tuesday almost $14.6 million in tourist tax funds to renovate and expand the Detroit Tigers' spring training complex.

The Detroit Tigers have made Lakeland their spring training home for 77 years. That relationship is the longest of its kind in Major League Baseball.

To keep that relationship going past the agreement end date of 2016, Polk County commissioners approved the money to renovate and expand the Tigertown complex.