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Prominent Orlando attorney John Morgan continues to put his money behind a proposed constitutional amendment that would gradually raise Florida’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.
Christian Simmons / WMFE

Prominent Orlando attorney John Morgan continues to put his money behind a proposed constitutional amendment that would gradually raise Florida’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Fight For $15 An Hour Continues At Orlando International Airport

Aug 4, 2019
Pixabay

Workers contracted by private companies to handle luggage and push wheelchairs at Orlando International Airport rallied Friday for a living wage.

Congressman Crist: Floridians Deserve A Raise

Jul 20, 2019

The U.S. House passed a bill Thursday that would gradually boost the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour by the year 2025.

"We haven’t had a raise in the minimum wage in the United States for ten years now, and certainly workers all across the country and particularly in Florida deserve a raise," says Congressman Charlie Crist (D-St. Petersburg). He voted in favor of the bill.

Quinnipiac University Poll logo
Quinnipiac University Poll

Support for a minimum wage hike in Florida is strong in every party, gender, education, age and racial group, according to an independent Quinnipiac University Poll.

However, support is divided on choosing whether or not to make felons pay fines before they can regain voting rights.

The Ledger

With the proposal awaiting a review by the Florida Supreme Court, prominent Orlando attorney John Morgan last month continued funneling money to a ballot measure that would increase the minimum wage. 

Florida workers and union members are pushing for a $15 minimum wage. But it may not be an easy feat in the state.


A bill that would prohibit local governments from regulating any requirements imposed on employers relating to minimum wage and conditions of employment cleared its first hurdle in the Florida Senate Tuesday in a party line vote.

The Florida Supreme Court has reversed course on a case regarding a minimum wage ordinance in Miami Beach.

Last year, the high court agreed to consider whether the city should be allowed to set its own minimum wage. Now, with three new justices on the bench, the court has decided not to hear the case. That means the lower court ruling against the city stands.

The wealthy Florida attorney who pushed the state initiative legalizing medical marijuana has a new target — increasing the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour.

New Year Brings Minimum Wage, Workers' Comp Changes

Jan 1, 2019

Minimum-wage workers will get a pay raise, businesses will get a break on insurance bills and a few new laws will take effect Tuesday as 2019 begins in Florida.

Minimum-wage workers will start earning $8.46 an hour Tuesday, up from $8.25 an hour in 2018 --- and more than a dollar above the $7.25 federal minimum wage.

Florida's Minimum Wage Set To Go Up On Jan. 1

Dec 28, 2018

New Year's Day is just around the corner, and that means more money for the lowest-paid workers in Florida.

Starting Jan. 1, the state’s minimum wage will go up by 21 cents, from $8.25 an hour to $8.46 an hour, according to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. 

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

Amazon will pay all of its U.S. employees a minimum of $15 an hour, more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25. The retail giant, run by the world's richest man, was criticized earlier this year after revealing its workers' median pay was $28,446.

Amazon says the new rate will go into effect on Nov. 1, covering all of its full-time, part-time, temporary and seasonal employees in the U.S.

The City of Miami Beach is in a battle with the state that could impact hundreds of Florida municipalitiesIt’s about home rule and the city’s ability to set its own policy when it comes to wages.

Florida’s minimum wage is $8.25 an hour. The amount may go up each year based on changes in the Consumer Price Index.

Miami Beach leaders voted two years ago to approve a higher minimum wage than the state.

Six bills from the 2017 legislative session became effective with the arrival of the New Year.

MoneyBlogNewz / Flickr Creative Commons

Florida's minimum wage will increase by 15 cents next year.

On January 1, the state's minimum wage will go from $8.10 per hour to $8.25 an hour. Tipped workers meanwhile will earn $5.23 an hour, also an increase of 15 cents.

Florida voters approved a statewide minimum wage in 2004. The Florida Minimum Wage Amendment was approved by a 71 % margin.  It’s recalculated each year based on the Consumer Price Index.

workingnurse.com

Did Gov. Rick Scott really brag about the state's low wages during business trips? And is there a critical shortage of nurses in Florida? WUSF's Steve Newborn gets to the bottom of these claims with Allison Graves of PolitiFact Florida.

MoneyBlogNewz / Flickr Creative Commons

Florida's minimum wage will increase by a nickel next year.

On January 1, the state's minimum wage will go from $8.05 per hour to $8.10 an hour. Tipped workers meanwhile will earn $5.08 an hour, also an increase of five cents.

Protests for $15 Minimum Wage in St. Petersburg

Jul 23, 2015
Yoselis Ramos

A couple dozen protesters chanted their slogans at the St. Petersburg City Hall Thursday morning, in support of raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour.  Among the protestors was Sade Reed, a Certified Nursing Assistant and she's a single mother to her 5 year old daughter. She said she lives paycheck to paycheck. 

"What I do is very important and I enjoy what I do," she said, "So I take care of your family, why can't I take care of mine?"

Quincy J. Walters / WUSF News

A national protest for higher wages for low-paid workers came to the Tampa Bay area Wednesday.

About 50 protesters gathered outside of a Walmart on Fletcher Avenue in Tampa. 

They were composed of Walmart employees, fast food employees and childcare workers.

Their demand: a higher minimum wage. It was part of a nationwide protest for the Fight for $15 movement, which seeks $15 an hour.

"Fifteen in my hand, I want fifteen in my hand," the group chanted. 

Low-Wage Workers Protest in Temple Terrace

Sep 4, 2014
Lucielle Salomon / WUSF

 Across the country and in Florida, low-wage workers protested on Thursday at lunchtime for higher pay. One of the places they gathered was at a McDonald's in Temple Terrace.

They want to be paid at least $15 per hour, and they also want the right to form a union.

Mandy Spencer works at the fast food restaurant in Temple Terrace. She said was nervous to go outside  and protest, but said her manager gave her permission.

Just in time for Labor Day, a new report finds that Florida’s minimum wage is less than half what workers need to cover basic expenses.

Gov. Scott, Reporters Duel Over Questions

Jul 15, 2014
Tessa Wiseman / WUSF

Gov. Rick Scott dodged questions on Monday at a campaign event in Largo about a recent  campaign stop in Tampa, to which on-duty police officers were invited. Then on Tuesday, when Scott was in Tampa on official business on hurricane preparedness, reporters again asked him questions outside that topic.

Blaise Gainey / WFSU

On Thursday, Florida Democratic House leaders announced policy priorities they say they won’t let go of without a fight this session: increasing education funding, raising the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour and getting more Floridians health insurance.

But Democrats likely face an uphill battle with almost twice their number of Republicans in the Legislature.

House Minority Leader Perry Thurston says Democrats want the education funding to include a new need-based component to the state’s Bright Futures college scholarship program.

He says Dems also want to continue the debate about getting more Floridians health insurance after the state chose not to take $51 billion in federal funding under the Affordable Care Act.

“Without a doubt, the Republicans are looking for a very smooth session. We think that the last thing that they want to address is the $51 billion elephant in the room," he says.

Dalia Colón / WUSF

Victor "Joseph" Doxa was a successful businessman with a six-figure salary and 7,000-square-foot home.

Then came the Great Recession.