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Marco Rubio

Lopez-Cantera Clears Path For Rubio To Run

Jun 16, 2016
The Associated Press

Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera advised supporters Wednesday that he will end his campaign for the U.S. Senate if longtime friend Marco Rubio decides to seek re-election.

Rubio To Hold Hearing On Heroin 'Epidemic'

May 25, 2016

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., will hold a hearing Thursday in Washington on heroin-related issues, with the panelists including Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs and officials from the U.S. Department of State and the federal Office of Drug Control Policy, according to Rubio's office.

Marco Rubio's Future Sure to Fuel Speculation

Mar 16, 2016
AP Photo/Paul Sancya

The end of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio's bid for the presidency, cut off by a crushing loss Tuesday in the Florida GOP primary, raises intriguing questions about what the onetime rising star in the Republican Party might do next.

Now that Donald Trump has won Florida's Republican presidential primary and U.S. Senator Marco Rubio has suspended his run, members of the GOP are dealing with the fallout at the state and local levels.

Florida’s primary on Tuesday could finally decide who will get both the Republican and Democratic presidential nomination.  The Sunshine State's pivotal role in the primary system was no accident, and it may be surprising to find out that the man behind Florida’s winner-take-all primary is Marco Rubio – whose own presidential aspirations may be decided on Tuesday night.

After all the debates and primaries and chatter from the political class, it all comes down to this: Tuesday's Florida primary may determine the next Republican candidate for president.

If Florida Senator Marco Rubio doesn't come in first - and collect 99 delegates in the winner-take-all contest, his quest is probably over.

Florida may be Sen. Marco Rubio's home turf, but it's also friendly terrain for his rival Donald Trump. On Friday morning, Trump began his day with a press conference at his luxurious Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach. Less than four days earlier, he had given a press conference at another one of his Florida properties — the Trump National Golf Club in Jupiter.

Rubio Rallies Florida Support Ahead Of Primary

Mar 12, 2016
Lottie Watts / WUSF

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio made several campaigns stops in Florida on Saturday, with a big focus on the Tampa Bay region.

Rubio appeared in Hudson, Tampa, Lakeland and Largo, where about 250 people turned out on Saturday morning for the rally in the parking lot of Beckwith Electric.

AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

Florida's winner-take-all Republican presidential primary was supposed to help former Gov. Jeb Bush or Sen. Marco Rubio.

That was the thinking when the GOP-dominated Legislature changed the state's primary date to the third Tuesday in March — the earliest date it could hold an election that will award all 99 Republican delegates to one candidate.

AP Photo/Gary McCullough

Coming off what may be his worst night of the primary season, Marco Rubio's make-or-break moment has arrived.

And the Florida senator, a home-state underdog with a week to prove he belongs in the 2016 presidential race, insists Florida will be his salvation.

"It has to happen here, and it has to happen now," he told a swelling Sarasota crowd Tuesday evening.

Steve Newborn / WUSF News

Just when Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio needs them the most, big-dollar contributors from the party's wealthy mainstream are having second thoughts about his future in the 2016 race.

Fresh misgivings about Rubio's path forward are the latest in a series of obstacles that threatens the Florida senator's future in this roller-coaster Republican campaign, with a must-win March 15 primary looming in his home state.

Steve Newborn / WUSF News

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio spoke to an enthusiastic crowd of about 1,000 people at the Tampa Convention Center Monday night, vowing not only to stay in the race for president, but saying he's the only Republican candidate who can beat front-runner Donald Trump.

AP Photo

Marco Rubio finds his Oval Office ambitions squeezed by Donald Trump's outsider ambush and the Republican Party's resulting identity crisis.

The Florida senator has struggled to reconnect with the kind of voters who sent him to Capitol Hill six years ago as a tea party favorite, instead watching them fuel Trump and his closest challenger to winning the GOP presidential nomination, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

Sen. Marco Rubio poses with supporters after the event
Steve Newborn/WUSF / WUSF News

As Republican Sen. Marco Rubio pursues the presidency, the Florida Democratic primary race to replace him pits a moderate embraced by party leaders against a fiery liberal who's offering a "one-finger salute" to Washington's Democratic establishment, and a large field of Republican contenders is trying to tap into an anti-Washington sentiment.

In their tenth debate with Donald Trump, Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz finally got real.

The two first-term senators, who have been chasing Trump in the polls and in February vote tallies, came at him on every issue their opposition research teams could muster.

It didn't take long for the results of the Nevada Republican caucuses to become apparent: Donald Trump had nearly double the support of his closest rival, Marco Rubio, in the state, where GOP officials are reporting voter turnout that far exceeds recent contests.

As NPR's Jessica Taylor writes, it's Trump's "third victory in two weeks and a huge surge of momentum heading into Super Tuesday."

Donald Trump posted a decisive victory Saturday night in South Carolina, a conservative state that on its face should have been inhospitable to the New York billionaire, but was anything but when voters went to the polls.

And Hillary Clinton pulled off a badly needed win in Nevada, besting Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders with an older, more diverse electorate in the state's caucuses.

As we dive into the entrance and exit polling data, here's four takeaways from the results.

1. Evangelical voters have faith in Donald Trump

AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Jeb Bush, John Kasich and Marco Rubio are locked in a high-stakes political chess match in South Carolina, strategically moving money and other campaign resources around in a bid to pull ahead in the Republican primary race — or at least keep their campaigns afloat.

After six months of wrangling on various TV stages, the seven Republican presidential candidates who met in Manchester, N.H., Saturday night finally produced A Moment.

The sharp exchange between Marco Rubio and Chris Christie near the beginning of the ABC News event cast a sudden shadow on Rubio's bright and rising star.

You Tube

What's Florida Sen. Marco Rubio's stance on cap and trade - and has it changed over the years? Rubio says no, but some of his opponents aren't so sure. To do some fact-checking on that claim - and whether a lack of dentistry can prove fatal - WUSF's Steve Newborn talks with Katie Sanders of PolitiFact Florida.

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