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Cesar Sayoc, accused of mailing potentially explosive devices to a number of prominent Democrats and Trump critics, had a list of more than 100 potential targets, multiple reports say.

One day after the FBI arrested a man in connection with improvised explosive devices sent to critics and opponents of President Trump, we're learning more about the suspect Cesar Altieri Sayoc.

Sayoc, 56, was arrested on Friday morning in South Florida and now faces federal five federal crimes including; transporting explosives across state lines, illegally mailing explosives, threatening former presidents and others, threatening interstate communications and assaulting federal officials

Before authorities apprehended suspect Cesar Sayoc in connection to the series of mail bombs, the case prompted all sorts of speculation and conspiracy theories. The bombs were all sent to high profile critics of President Trump

"It is a high probability that the whole thing is set up as a false flag to gain sympathy for the Democrats," said talk radio host Michael Savage, "and to get our minds off the hordes of illegal aliens approaching our southern border."

Updated at 7:40 p.m. ET

Cesar Altieri Sayoc, the Florida man arrested and charged on Friday in connection with the wave of improvised explosive devices mailed this week to prominent Democrats and critics of President Trump, has a long criminal history, including a charge of making a bomb threat.

On Friday’s Florida Roundup we led with breaking news as authorities arrested a man in connection with the wave of suspicious packages sent this week to political critics of President Donald Trump.

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The Justice Department is holding a press conference about the wave of suspicious packages that have been sent to political enemies of President Trump this week. A suspect has been arrested in Avenutra.

Watch the remarks live starting at about 2:30 p.m.

Broward County Sheriff's Office

A Florida man with a long criminal history was charged Friday in the nationwide mail-bomb scare targeting prominent Democrats who have traded criticism with President Donald Trump. It was a first break in a case that has seized the national conversation and spread fear of election-season violence with little precedent in the U.S.

Just a week after the 2001 al-Qaida attacks terrorized the U.S., anonymous letters with anthrax spores began arriving at congressional offices and media companies, killing five people, infecting 17 and unleashing their own wave of fear.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

Federal authorities expanded their nationwide search on Thursday for the person who sent a wave of suspected explosive devices to political nemeses of President Trump.

Ten devices addressed to eight targets have been intercepted or discovered, but no one has been hurt. It isn't clear whether or not the attack is over; the FBI said it can't rule out that more suspicious packages might still be moving through the mail.

Updated at 9:38 p.m. ET

At least seven suspicious packages containing what the FBI called potentially destructive devices have been sent since Monday to several leading Democratic Party figures and to CNN in New York, triggering a massive investigation.