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The Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and StateImpact Florida have obtained internal emails and a recording of a company meeting that provide new insight into allegations that K12 Inc., the nation’s largest online education company, uses teachers in Florida who do not have all of the required state certifications.

Some Florida School Districts Not Checking For K12 Problems

Sep 16, 2012

Seminole County teacher Amy Capelle had to make a decision.

Her supervisor at the nation’s largest online school, K12, asked her to sign a roster saying she’d taught 112 kids.

She’d only taught seven.

“If you see your name next to a student that might not be yours, it’s because you are qualified to teach that subject, and we needed to put your name there,” wrote K12 supervisor Samantha Gilormini in an e-mail.

Capelle refused, and now state officials are investigating whether K12 used improperly certified teachers and asked employees to cover it up.

In K12 Courses, 275 Students to a Single Teacher

Sep 16, 2012

Student-teacher ratios at K12, the nation’s largest online educator, are nearly twice as high as Florida’s state-run virtual school, according to internal company documents obtained by the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and StateImpact Florida.

A high school teacher working for K12 may have as many as 275 students, compared to Florida Virtual School, which has a maximum class size of 150.

Editor’s note: This story was written by Trevor Aaronson with the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting.

Florida Investigates K12, Nation's Largest Online Educator

Sep 11, 2012

Editor’s note: This story was written by Trevor Aaronson of the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and John O’Connor with StateImpact Florida.

Florida’s Department of Education has launched an investigation of K12, the nation’s largest online educator, over allegations the company uses uncertified teachers and asked employees to help cover up the practice.

K12 officials told certified teachers to sign class rosters that included students they hadn’t taught, according to documents that are part of the investigation.