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Florida lawmakers finished the 2019 legislative session Saturday by passing a budget for the upcoming year.

The Florida Health Care Association is against a Florida House bill that would eliminate the “certificate of need” process for healthcare facilities. Currently nursing homes are among the facilities that must demonstrate sufficient need in a location before building a new site.

Panel To Dig Into Health Issues For DeSantis

Dec 11, 2018

Lt. Gov.-elect Jeanette Nuñez and former Agency for Health Care Administration Secretary Alan Levine are co-chairing a committee that could help shape health-care plans for incoming Gov. Ron DeSantis.

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Negative experiences with health care have caused some minority patients, particularly African American men, to distrust the medical system.

Health Care Not An Elixir For Florida Democrats

Nov 9, 2018

Florida Democrats pushed health care as a top priority during this year’s elections, hammering Republicans for attempts to repeal Obamacare and the potential loss of insurance protections for people with pre-existing conditions.

The personality looming over the 2018 midterms was President Donald Trump. The issue was health care, the top concern for voters as they decided how to cast their ballots.

Health care proved important but apparently not pivotal in the 2018 midterm elections on Tuesday as voters gave Democrats control of the U.S. House, left Republicans in charge in the Senate and appeared to order an expansion of Medicaid in at least three states long controlled by Republicans.

Health Care Top Issue For Florida Voters

Oct 19, 2018

More than the economy, immigration and gun reform, health care is the number one issue for Republicans and Democrats heading to the polls in Florida this November. 

Dissenters Protest DeSantis Over ACA Stance

Oct 1, 2018

Parents of children with pre-existing conditions protested outside a gubernatorial candidate’s campaign stop in Central Florida this weekend. Sophia Cauley was among them.

She held a sign that read “DeSantis Care is a Disaster” outside the Republican gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis’ rally at Iglesia Nacion de Fe in Kissimmee on Saturday.

The day had special significance for her because: “I have a daughter Fiona Carter who five years ago today passed away from sickle cell anemia due to not being able to get healthcare,” Cauley said.

Daylina Miller and Mark Schreiner/WUSF News

When it comes to health care, Democratic candidate for Governor Andrew Gillum and his Republican opponent Ron DeSantis couldn't be further apart.

Despite a strong economy, about 40 percent of American families struggled to meet at least one of their basic needs last year, including paying for food, health care, housing or utilities.

Reflecting the same fault lines that have emerged nationally, Florida’s Democratic and Republican candidates for governor are deeply split over whether the state should take a more direct role in providing health care.

Blue tarps still dot rooftops, homes lack electricity needed to refrigerate medicines, and clinics chip away at debts incurred from running generators. Yet despite these residual effects from last year's devastating hurricanes, Puerto Rico is moving ahead with major cuts to its health care safety net that will affect more than a million of its poorest residents.

Florida is below the national average when it comes to recommended weekly fitness goals for adults. 

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

While across the nation the cultural and political tug-of-war over health care rages on, locally, healers keep on healing. But providing care for people can get complicated when they don’t have health insurance.


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In this podcast, WUSF's Robin Sussingham, Stephanie Colombini and Julio Ochoa break down the recent Florida Matters Town Hall that was recorded in front of a live audience in St. Petersburg.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida Matters recently hosted a town hall event in St. Petersburg about providing health care to the uninsured. We're taking another listen to highlights from the panel discussion and questions from the audience on this week's episode.


Congress delivered a victory to President Donald Trump by expanding private care for veterans as an alternative to the troubled Veterans Affairs health system.

It came down to the wire, but a federal agency that helps thousands of Florida seniors sign up for Medicare will be funded for another year.

Corcoran Health Care Success A Mixed Bag

Mar 13, 2018

Before becoming House speaker, Richard Corcoran promised in 2015 that he was going to tackle the “Gucci-loafing, shoe-wearing special interest powers” that lobby in Tallahassee and protect the status quo.

Direct Primary Care Teed Up For Final Approval

Mar 8, 2018

The Florida Legislature is poised to pass a bill that would create the “statutory footing” for direct primary-care agreements among physicians, patients and employers.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

While across the nation the cultural and political tug-of-war over health care rages on, locally, healers keep on healing. But providing care for people can get complicated when they don’t have health insurance.


Displaced Puerto Ricans Face Obstacles Getting Health Care

Nov 21, 2017

The federal government has granted people affected by the devastating hurricanes that wracked coastal states and Puerto Rico 15 extra days to sign up for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

But Puerto Ricans who fled to the mainland after the destruction face problems well beyond timing.

After Hurricane Harvey flooded her city of Houston in August, Dr. Jennifer McQuade planned to donate socks to those affected. Instead, surprised by the lack of medical care at a nearby shelter, McQuade, an oncologist, became the unofficial leader of a group of physicians and mothers providing emergency aid at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. She triaged patients, solicited donations and recruited more doctors to join.

Frustrated by failures in Congress, President Donald Trump will try to put his own stamp on health care with an executive order Thursday that aims to make lower-premium plans more widely available.

Florida Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson has co-signed a letter asking the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to send more support to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

Health-care funding was already tight before the storms, particularly in financially unstable Puerto Rico, where nearly half the population is covered by Medicaid.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Tampa Congresswoman Kathy Castor are asking the federal government to step in after thousands of kids were kicked off a state Medicaid program. The two Democrats sent a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price earlier this week.


Hispanics in the United States have a longer life expectancy, but a poll finds few older Latinos are confident that nursing homes and assisted living facilities can meet their needs.

In a Sarasota neighborhood with no doctor’s offices and little access to health care, a new clinic in Newtown is bringing medical care and so much more. 

Having long decried the failings of the Affordable Care Act, Senate Republicans are purporting to fix one of its loopholes with their newly unveiled health plan. The so-called coverage gap left more than 2.5 million people living below the poverty line of $11,880 for an individual ineligible for Medicaid or financial assistance to buy insurance — even as higher earners got subsidy checks to buy theirs.

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