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Editor's note: This story includes images that some readers may find disturbing.

Sherrine Petit Homme LaFrance was crying on the side of a road when China Laguerre spotted her.

Hurricane Dorian destroyed LaFrance's newly constructed house in Great Abaco Island on the northern edge of the Bahamas the same night she moved in. That was on Sept. 1.

Haitian And Salvadoran TPS Holders Sue Trump Administration

Feb 23, 2018

Eight Haitian and Salvadoran immigrants living in the United States with temporary protection from deportation have filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration, arguing that its decision to end Temporary Protected Status was based on racism and discrimination that violates their constitutional rights.

Almost eight years after an earthquake destroyed their country – and prompted the U.S. to let them stay in this country protected from deportation – more than 50,000 Haitians were told on Monday they will soon lose that benefit.

The six-month extension of Temporary Protected Status for Haitians began over the weekend, and ends in January of 2018. 

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly visited Port-au-Prince Wednesday to meet with Haitian President Jovenel Moise. The visit came after Kelly recommended a 6-month extension for Haitian Temporary Protected Status in May. Haitian activists and advocates had been pushing for at least an 18-month extension to the policy that protects them from deportation. 

At a National Hurricane Center press conference in Miami after the visit, Kelly said he encourages Haitians to remember it was never meant to be a permanent solution.

Immigration lawyers and Haitian community activists hosted a social media live event on Monday to stress the necessity for recipients of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to gather their documents and contact a local immigration lawyer if they want to stay in the United States after the program's deadline in January.

“The first things that people really need to do is get an attorney, get a consultation – at least a consultation with an attorney,” said Vanessa Joseph, immigration attorney, on a Facebook Live event watched by 42,000 people and shared 842 times. 

Florida’s Haitian immigrants are getting a six month reprieve on deportation orders. Advocates are claiming a small victory, but the timeline falls short of what many hoped for. Some are worried the community’s special status may be coming to an end.

A Florida lawmaker is criticizing the federal government’s temporary extension of special status for Haitian immigrants. After the 2010 earthquake, the federal government allowed thousands of Haitians to take refuge in the U.S. This week President Donald Trump extended those protections again, but by six months, not the eighteen months advocates hoped for.