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Government Shutdown

Emily Nipps / Tampa International Airport

Representatives Kathy Castor, D-Tampa and Charlie Crist, D-St. Petersburg joined a host of local federal workers at Tampa International Airport Tuesday to talk about the government shutdown and its continuing effects.

Photo by Steven Brooke

The percentage of TSA airport screeners missing work has hit 10 percent as the partial government shutdown stretches into its fifth week. 

As the partial government shutdown continues into its third week, federal workers in Florida are applying for unemployment to make up for lost pay.

Flickr Creative Commons

One of the federal programs affected by the partial government shutdown is the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, or SNAP. If the shutdown continues into March, funding for the program could run out. And in Florida that means a lot of low-income and homeless veterans may have to fend for themselves. More veterans in Florida rely on food stamps than any other state.

Photo by Steven Brooke

Florida airports are helping federal workers who aren't getting paid during the government shutdown by offering free food, holding a food drive and opening a food bank. 

Long-time federal contractor John Woodson arrived at an unemployment office in Washington, D.C. early Thursday morning. Ordinarily, Woodson would be receiving a paycheck, but because of the partial government shutdown, Woodson spent his day filing an unemployment claim instead.

"We should still be at work right now," said Woodson. "Politicians should handle this — don't put this on the citizens. You're hurting us."

Even if Woodson can get unemployment, which pays up to $425 a week in D.C., he says it won't be enough to care for his family.

Miami International Airport is closing a terminal this weekend due to the government shutdown because security screeners have been calling in sick at twice the airport's normal rate.

As a partial government shutdown continues into its third week, NASA announced the delay of a test flight of SpaceX’s Commercial Crew capsule. The private company is assessing any impacts the partial government shutdown might have on upcoming launches.

New Bottled Brews Delayed By Government Shutdown

Jan 11, 2019

Craft beer drinkers in the U.S. may see fewer new bottled beers coming out in the next few months.

That's because the federal agency that approves brewery labels is closed, a result of the government shutdown.

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. One of the TTB's jobs is to review beverage alcohol labels for things like alcohol content or fluid ounces in a bottle.

Employees of Florida’s federal prisons are asking the state’s members of congress to push for a reversal of the U.S. government shutdown. Workers held a rally in Downtown Tallahassee on Thursday.

Although the Atlantic hurricane season begins on June 1st, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Weather Service (NWS) and the National Hurricane Center (NHC) use the months in between for critical research.

So what effect might a prolonged federal government shutdown have on hurricane forecasting and research?

Updated at 9:25 a.m. ET

As the federal government enters the second full week of its partial shutdown, federal workers aren't the only ones affected.

Presents were exchanged, carols were sung, and the political news cycle kept on churning over the Christmas holiday.

The time surrounding Christmas and New Year's Day saw the partial government shutdown begin, the stock market take a tumble (then recover), and President Trump make a secret holiday visit to U.S. troops stationed in Iraq.

As 2019 begins, here's a look at what you may have missed over the holidays.

Saturday, Dec. 22

Updated at 11:51 a.m. ET Wednesday

As the partial government shutdown continues into its second week, President Trump has invited a bipartisan group of top lawmakers to the White House for talks.

President Trump on Friday issued an executive order freezing the salary rates for federal workers. The order wasn't a surprise but for some 800,000 federal employees furloughed during the partial government shutdown or working without pay, it was like rubbing salt into a wound.

Ten days into the partial government shutdown, it's time to ask a dreaded question: What if this keeps going?

A new congressional session begins Thursday, at which time Democrats become the majority in the House. There's no indication that progress will be made before then on the political standoff over funding a border wall that President Trump is demanding.

What's running — and what isn't — during the shutdown

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) hosted a press event Friday to highlight his accomplishments over the past two years, but he spent most of his time fielding questions from reporters about the ongoing government shutdown and border security.

The Christmas season is typically one of the busiest times of the year at Joshua Tree National Park in California, as rock climbers and car campers flock to the high desert getaway.

As hope for a last-minute resolution to the political standoff that has triggered the government shutdown all but evaporates, Smithsonian officials announced Thursday that all of its museums, as well as the National Zoo, will be shuttered on Jan. 2 unless a deal is reached.

"There's no getting around it," Linda St. Thomas, chief spokeswoman for the Smithsonian, told NPR.

The partial government shutdown that started Saturday will affect quite a few activities of the Food and Drug Administration.

Although most of the agency's employees weren't working over the weekend and on Monday and Tuesday because of federal holidays, FDA will furlough some 40 percent of its staff starting Wednesday.

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government, which is affecting more than 800,000 federal workers and numerous government agencies, also has consequences for the Violence Against Women Act, which expired at midnight on Friday.

Separately, both the House and the Senate passed spending deals that included clauses that would have extended VAWA until Feb. 8.

But because the law's future became inextricably tied to the larger budget debate, which hinges on a dispute between Democrats and Republicans over funding for a border wall, it was not reauthorized.

Amid the partial government shutdown, at least one critical service remains operational: NORAD's Santa tracker.

More than 1,500 military personnel and volunteers at an Air Force base in Colorado will be hard at work Christmas Eve, tracking Santa Claus and answering children's calls.

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government that began Saturday affects about a quarter of the government. About 800,000 federal workers will feel the effects as lawmakers try to come to an agreement on a set of spending bills to keep the government funded.

A central sticking point remains funding for President Trump's proposed border wall, and with the Senate adjourned until Thursday, there is no apparent quick end in sight.

Updated at 10:48 p.m. ET

The House passed a short-term funding bill Thursday night that includes the money for additional border security President Trump wants — but the measure is unlikely to pass the Senate, raising the likelihood of a partial government shutdown that would begin Friday night at midnight.

Congress, once again, finds itself days away from a potential government shutdown, and a fight over immigration could stand in the way of a deal to prevent it.

"It could happen," Trump told reporters Wednesday. "Democrats are really looking at something that is very dangerous for our country. They are looking at shutting down. They want to have illegal immigrants in many cases, people that we don't want in our country, they want to have illegal immigrants pouring into our country."

Six House Republicans from Florida voted with Democrats to reopen the government and lift the debt ceiling Wednesday night, including two from Tampa Bay: Rep. Gus Bilirakis from Palm Harbor and Rep. Vern Buchanan from Sarasota.

Both released statements assuring constituents that they were still opposed to the Affordable Care Act and would continue to seek ways to derail or improve it. But they said they had to act to prevent a default on the national debt and end the government shutdown.

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As you've listened to or watched or read coverage of the government shutdown, how many times have you heard the situation in Washington referred to as a standoff, or an impasse or a stalemate?

Well, there's no doubt about it being a shutdown.