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Florida weather

Storms moving in off the Gulf of Mexico produced a wet Thursday morning commute.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

The cold front that had promised to create soggy conditions over Tampa Bay is firmly in control, stalled over the region and dumping heavy rain for the Thursday morning commute.

The good news? Things return to normal this weekend, meaning storms starting inland and drifting toward the west coast in the afternoon.

The wet morning conditions are fueled by the stalled front, combined with deep tropical moisture and winds from the southwest that are driving the storms off the Gulf of Mexico, according to the National Weather Service.

Forecasters are monitoring a cold front that could pose a much more serious impact in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and the Tampa Bay area.
NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

While Tropical Depression Three appears poised to fizzle out as it spins off the east coast of Florida and moves away from the state, forecasters are monitoring a cold front that could pose a much more serious impact in the northern Gulf of Mexico – and the Tampa Bay area.

The low-pressure system that dipped into the Gulf of Mexico from Georgia strengthened into Tropical Storm Barry on Thursday morning and continues to make its way west, on a projected path toward Louisiana as a potential Category 1 hurricane.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

By Carl Lisciandrello

The low-pressure system that dipped into the Gulf of Mexico from Georgia strengthened into Tropical Storm Barry on Thursday morning and continues to make its way west, on a projected path toward Louisiana as a potential Category 1 hurricane.

A tropical storm watch has been issued for parts of Mississippi and Louisiana as a system that has moved into the Gulf of Mexico is poised to form into a tropical depression by Thursday and could become a hurricane before the weekend.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

The National Hurricane Center has classified the tropical low over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico as a “potential tropical cyclone” (PTC), and it could become a hurricane before hitting Louisiana this weekend.

Gallons of drinking water sits on shelves.
Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF Public Media

Hurricane season started June 1 and officials are sending out their annual message: it's imperative to know what to do before, during, and after a storm.

Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

A strong cold front is slated to sweep through the state this weekend, dropping temperatures in the Tampa Bay area into the 30s by Monday morning.

There's the possibility that some spots north of Tampa will experience a freeze.

Flooding, high winds, and tornadoes are possible in Florida Thursday as yet another strong storm system sweeps across the state. This will be the fourth front in as many weeks, and it could be the strongest.

The area of low pressure was noted on satellite data to be rapidly developing in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, where it is forecast to quickly strengthen overnight. The center of the low will approach the Florida's Big Bend region Thursday, but impacts will be far-reaching and likely felt across all of Florida.

Up to four major hurricanes could form in the Atlantic this hurricane season, according to the annual forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. Overall, the season will likely be normal or somewhat more intense than normal, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says, with a 25 percent chance that hurricane activity will be below normal.

National Weather Service

The Arctic blast sweeping much of the country brought wind-chill warnings and the threat of frost as far south as Fort Lauderdale, where homeless shelters opened their doors for people hoping to escape the cold.

Snow Flurries In Tallahassee As Winter Storm Hits State

Jan 3, 2018
City of Tallahassee

Snow flurries are falling as far south as Tallahassee where officials were forced to close a section of Interstate 10 due to icy conditions.

Florida Publi Radio Emergency Network

Even with two months left in the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, it's already been one of the more active ones in recent years, at least here in Florida.

Strong Gulf Storm Soaking Florida

Jan 15, 2016
Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

A fast-moving strong area of low pressure is swinging through the state, soaking most of Florida and even carrying with it a risk for severe weather.

For the middle of July, it's not unusual for the tropics to be quiet. Dry air from west Africa, higher winds aloft, and pockets of cooler than normal water in the Atlantic will keep storms from forming over the next 5 to 7 days.

However, what is unusual for July in Florida is a cold front. No, it won't move all the way through and cool us off much. Instead, it will bring above normal rainfall and the potential for strong thunderstorms to parts of the state. This starts Tuesday in the panhandle, then moves into central Florida Wednesday. Rainfall amounts with this system will range from 1 to 4 inches, with the highest totals likely in central Florida.

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