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The Florida Roundup

On this week's Florida Roundup, we discussed the Florida connection to the impeachment inquiry surrounding President Donald Trump with Emily Mahoney, Florida Government Reporter, Tampa Bay Times and Miami Herald.

This week we took a closer look at what President Donald Trump wants to do with Medicare, and how it could affect the millions of Floridians who count on it for health care, with:

On today’s show, we looked at how the impeachment inquiry is playing with Florida voters. 

Millions of students and adults around the world took time off from school and work Friday to participate in a Global Climate Strike. The action comes ahead of a planned United Nations Climate Action Summit that takes place next week in New York.

Florida Charter Schools Get Mixed Marks for Success

Sep 14, 2019

Nearly 300,000 students attend charter schools in Florida. Charters are taxpayer funded, privately run and are changing the state’s public education system.

Many students across the Sunshine State headed back to school this week, and others will do so in the coming weeks. So, we spent the full hour looking at how school safety rules are being implemented, and the effects they could have on student mental health.

On this week's Florida Roundup we look at the proposed "citizens amendment." 

Florida’s heat set record highs last month. The Union of Concerned Scientists says in less than 20 years, Florida will be so hot for so much of the year that it could literally be life threatening. The scientists in a new report say the world must reduce carbon emissions now or face extreme heat that will take lives within decades. 

On Friday, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta resigned due to the role he played in the Jeffrey Epstein case while serving as U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida. Back in 2008, Acosta approved a plea deal for Epstein, a convicted sex trafficker. The deal offered very little jail time, even though a 53-page indictment detailed all of Epstein’s alleged crimes.

Our guests for the discussion were:

When Bill Galvano became the leader of the Florida Senate, he made it clear that his top priority was building new roads.

In January, weeks before the start of the legislative session, Galvano called for three new roads. He called them corridors. Lawmakers and Governor Ron DeSantis agreed with Galvano and now the state’s biggest road project in 50 years is moving forward.

With the expansion comes concerns about the potential environmental impact, along with the additional stress motorists will endure during construction.

This week we learned not one but two Florida counties had their voting databases hacked, but we didn’t learn which two.

stock photo of guns in holsters
Lucio Eastman / Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers are poised to expand a school security program allowing teachers to carry guns in the classroom. However, some school districts are lobbying against it.

On Friday’s Florida Roundup, we devoted the full hour to the debate over immigration and sanctuary cities in the Sunshine State.

4/5/19: Prescription Drug Costs

Apr 7, 2019

On this week's Florida Roundup, we took a closer look at the rising costs of prescription drugs in the Sunshine State - and what state leaders are trying to do about it.

Former Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, who narrowly lost his bid in the gubernatorial race last year, has launched a push to register 1 million Florida residents to vote before the 2020 presidential election.

Federal prosecutors say a Florida man helped rich and famous parents get their kids into colleges with bribes and fake test scores. We took a closer look at the college admissions scandal with John Delaney, Former Jacksonville Mayor and President Emeritus of the University of North Florida; and Colleen Wright, Education Reporter for the Miami Herald.

From Sanctuary Cities to a bid to bring the headquarters of President Donald Trump's Space Force to Florida, here's a summary of what you'll hear in this week's Roundup.

Almost 100,000 people are serving time behind bars in Florida state prisons, where there’s a shortage of guards and healthcare costs are expensive. We took a closer look at the state’s attempts to address its overcrowded and underfunded prisons with Health News Florida’s Julio Ochoa and John Kennedy, capitol reporter for GateHouse Media.

Airbnb

On The Florida Roundup this week, we began with a look at the predicament of the state’s so-called “Forgotten Coast.” 

1/25/19: Medical Marijuana

Jan 25, 2019

This week on The Florida Roundup, we took a closer look at the future of medical marijuana in the Sunshine State.

Florida may be the next battleground state over abortion rights. With six weeks until the start of the Legislative session, a new proposal has been filed that would ban abortions if a doctor detects a fetal heartbeat.

Ron DeSantis' Busy First 96 Hours As Governor

Jan 14, 2019

From decisions on ethics, to the environment, to a Supreme Court pick, Ron DeSantis got a lot done in his first four days as Governor of the state of Florida.

Though it’s far too early to make conclusions about the way DeSantis will lead, it does appear the Republican governor is “trying to take some steps that will have broad appeal,” said Jim Saunders, Executive Editor for News Service of Florida, Friday on The Florida Roundup.

This week on The Florida Roundup, we discussed Governor Ron DeSantis’ first few days in office – and what lies ahead – with Jim Saunders, Executive Editor for News Service of Florida and Ana Ceballos, who covers state government and politics for the USA TODAY NETWORK.

Following a messy election, a fresh political season is set to begin in Florida. New state leaders will be sworn in Jan. 8, including incoming Florida Governor Ron DeSantis.

Although he still has a few decisions to make on key positions, DeSantis and his team have worked to fill hundreds of jobs in the administration, including for some of the state’s most prominent posts.

Meanwhile, state lawmakers are filing bills for the 2019 Legislative session that begins in March.

Education is an enormous piece of the state budget. Hundreds of thousands of people work in the industry, and millions of Florida families send their kids to public schools each day.

When Will Amendment 4 Be Implemented?

Dec 16, 2018

More than one million felons in Florida are supposed to be able to register to vote in a little over three weeks. 

Amendment 4 —the ‘Voting Restoration Amendment’ — was approved by 65 percent of voters on Nov. 6, amending the state constitution to return the right to vote to most felons after they’ve served their sentences. It goes into effect January 8.

12/14/2018: Felon Voting Rights Next Steps

Dec 14, 2018

Florida voters approved a constitutional amendment restoring the voting rights of most felons, but with just weeks before it goes into effect, there’s no clarity on how it will be implemented.

The Trump Administration has approved the search for oil and natural gas off the Atlantic coast. Late last month, the federal government gave the green light to five applications that allow companies to use seismic testing in different sites, including along part of Florida’s eastern seaboard.

The tests work by using airguns to send sound waves through the water to image the sea floor. The waves then bounce back to deliver information about the location of buried oil and gas.

Soon you may hear the sound of seismic tests up and down Florida’s Atlantic Coast.

Orlando has committed to powering itself entirely with renewable energy by 2050. Miami-Dade County has a goal to plant 1 million trees by 2020 to achieve a 30 percent tree canopy cover. Satellite Beach, south of Cape Canaveral, is implementing aggressive plans to protect itself against climate change.

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