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Florida Matters

Florida Matters tackles tough issues, highlights little-known stories from our part of the world, and provides a greater perspective of what it means to live in the Sunshine State. Join us each week as we journey across the state to explore the issues important to Floridians and cover the challenges facing our community and our state. Listen to the show on WUSF 89.7 Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7:30 a.m.  It's also on Classical WSMR 89.1 and 103.9 on Mondays at 10 p.m.

Contact Florida Matters at floridamatters@wusf.org

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Krayl Funch

Sometimes when something is as universal, necessary and mundane as eating, it's hard to make "food" sound special. But not for the people on this Florida Matters.

WUSF has been talking to people who communicate their passion about food in particularly interesting ways. Food...as muse.

Our guests include:

Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters we're taking another listen to our show about people who communicate their passion for food in particularly interesting ways.

In this preview, Florida Matters reporter Bobbie O'Brien visits the kitchen of Tampa Bay Times cookbook reviewer Ileana Morales Valentine as she tests a new recipe.


WUSF Public Media

Throughout this past year, members of WUSF 89.7 and Classical WSMR have been highlighting live music that makes the Tampa Bay Area a little more special as part of our ongoing Art Populi series.

This week on Florida Matters we hear some of those stories.


Yuisa Rios / FEMA

More than two months after Hurricane Maria battered Puerto Rico, thousands are still fleeing the island and many are coming to Florida.

This week on Florida Matters we'll discuss the impact of the Puerto Rican migration to Florida during the latest edition of our monthly news roundtable.


Steven Shepard / FEMA

This week on Florida Matters we're hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable. We'll discuss how the Puerto Rican migration to Florida after Hurricane Maria could impact our state.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

This is the Sunshine State, so doesn’t solar power make sense? Then why does it only make up a tiny fraction of Florida’s electricity output? This week on Florida Matters we’re talking about the promise and prognosis of solar energy in the state.


Books, music, authors, food -- it's time for the 25th annual Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading. This week on Florida Matters we're talking with three of the authors that will be featured in the event, held Saturday November 11 at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg.


This week on Florida matters we'll talk with three authors who will be featured during the upcoming Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading on November 11.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Florida’s power companies have invested billions and billions of dollars to harden the electrical grid since the hurricanes of 2004 and 2005. Could you tell?

If you lost power after Hurricane Irma – and 6.5 million homes did – it may have been hard to discern how things have improved in the last dozen years.


www.blendspace.com

Electricity is such a mundane part of life we may not think about it that often -- until you lose power during a hurricane and are left sitting for days in the Florida heat! We're talking about electrical power this week on Florida Matters.


Richard Spencer shakes things up in Gainesville, Florida’s traditional public schools push back against a charter school law and Obamacare insurance subsidies may live to see another day. This week on Florida Matters we’re hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable.


V@s (Wikimedia Commons)

This week on Florida Matters we're hosting another edition of our monthly news roundtable. One topic that was all over the news this past week was white nationalist Richard Spencer's visit to the University of Florida.


Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Bipartisanship in Washington -- or lack thereof -- and what Florida voters can do about it. That's what two former Congressman are talking about in a series of town halls around the state.


Former Congressmen David Jolly, a Republican, and Patrick Murphy, a Democrat, are currently on a speaking tour to address the lack of bi-partisanship in Washington D.C. 

USF St. Petersburg/Stephanie Colombini

One of the area's leading African American family-owned newspapers, The Weekly Challenger in St. Petersburg, just celebrated its 50th anniversary. Tampa's preeminent Hispanic newspaper, La Gaceta, is approaching 100 years. This week on Florida Matters we're talking about the history and cultural impact of ethnic publications in the Tampa Bay area.


Stephanie Colombini/USF St. Petersburg

One of the area's leading newspapers, The Weekly Challenger in St. Petersburg, just celebrated its 50th anniversary. This week on Florida Matters we're talking about the history and cultural impact of Tampa Bay's ethnic publications.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

This week on Florida Matters we're taking another listen to our discussion about foster care in the region.

We're starting something new on Florida Matters. Once a month we're going to gather together some experienced reporters from around the state for perspective on the important news happening in Florida.

This week we're talking about the consequences of Hurricane Irma, and lessons learned from the storm.

Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

Hurricane Irma was the strongest storm to hit Florida in 12 years, and it impacted nearly the entire state -- from wind damage and storm surge, to evacuations, gas shortages and of course the loss of power for millions.


Hurricane Irma was the strongest storm to hit Florida in more than a decade.

Irma was an epic storm. It was stronger and bigger than almost all hurricanes on record and lasted longer than any storm on record. From the Lower Florida Keys to St.

WUSF Public Media

We’ve been asking you to share your experience with Hurricane Irma, and many Tampa Bay area residents answered our call.

This week on Florida Matters we hear from listeners who told us what it was like for them to make it through the storm, and how they’ve been holding up since Irma left the state.


WUSF Public Media

WUSF and WSMR provided you with continuing coverage on Hurricane Irma. Now we want to invite you to join the conversation.

We're hosting a special live call-in program Tuesday September 12 at 9 AM on WUSF 89.7. 

Flickr

Communities across Florida are preparing for the potential impact of Hurricane Irma, and one natural line of defense we have is the state’s beaches.

But not all beaches are equally suited to protect us, thanks to past storm damage, coastal development and Florida’s ever-changing landscape.


Marc Haze / WUSF News

Hurricane season is well underway. And storms that hit the coast can wreak havoc on our state's beaches. This week on Florida Matters we're taking another listen to our discussion on beach erosion and how to repair it.


WRCH 2017

For the first time in over 20 years, the World Rowing Championships will return to the U.S. next month in Sarasota-Bradenton.

This week on Florida Matters we’re talking about the sport of rowing and what it means to host the championships in the Tampa Bay Area.


Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

The best rowers in the world will converge on Sarasota at the end of September. This will be the biggest competition to date at a new facility built in the shadow of Interstate 75.

USF LIBRARIES DIGITAL HERITAGE AND HUMANITIES COLLECTIONS

Imagine leaving for work in the morning and finding out a few hours later that your home and every possession within it has been swallowed by the earth. Sinkholes in Florida make that a real possibility.


South Florida Information Access / U.S. Geological Survey

Sinkholes are making headlines again in Florida, and that has many homeowners concerned about how such a disaster could impact their neighborhoods.


Daylina Miller/WUSF News

It's just after 8 p.m. on a recent Friday night outside  the King Corona Cafe in Tampa's Ybor City. Throngs of people are filing into the many bars and clubs hosted alongside historic 7th Avenue, but some are here for a different kind of entertainment.

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