LISTEN LIVE

film

Film Tampa Bay

This week on Florida Matters we talk about how the state’s film industry has fared since the loss of a tax incentive program and how it can survive in the future.

Film Tampa Bay

A new report from Florida TaxWatch says the state may lose its film industry if it doesn't bring back an incentive program for production.


Flickr

This week on Florida Matters we're talking about how the state's film industry has fared since it ended a tax incentive program in 2016.

A bill that addresses Florida’s collapsing film industry was presented at a press conference Wednesday. If successful, its sponsors hope it will create a new era of filmmaking within the sunshine state.

My Time In Cannes

Aug 12, 2015
Quincy Walters / WUSF News

Before each feature film at the Cannes Film Festival, an enchanting piece of music from Camille Saint-Saen's Carnival of the Animals, plays. For me, it reinforced the magical nature of attending one of the world's most important film venues. 

Film Industry Leaders Push For Incentives

May 26, 2015

Film industry leaders are making another push to get an incentives deal through the Florida legislature. They’re banking on its inclusion in a tax package when lawmakers return to Tallahassee for a special session next week.

Film incentives bills - designed to lure production to Florida - died in the House and Senate when the regular session ended early. But Representative Mike Miller, who sponsored the House Bill, says there’s still hope.

“What is still alive is the incentives program through the tax package that has been presented in the call by the speaker of the house and the senate president”, said Miller.

Miller says the current incentives program - which ran out of money - would be extended by one year. He says lawmakers first have to settle major issues like healthcare.

Creature.com

Opponents of tax incentives for the film industry scored a de-facto victory in the 2015 legislative session’s surprise ending. But Americans for Prosperity is bracing for the sequel.

The conservative government watchdog group released a letter Monday urging Governor Rick Scott to keep the film credits off the agenda when a special session convenes June 1.

Since 2010, the state has spent $295 million to attract films, TV shows and commercials. The program expired and some lawmakers are fighting to revive it.

Quincy Walters / WUSF News

There's a new movie-watching experience in town. On the third Wednesday of every month, a small group of cinema buffs are watching unconventional films in unconventional spaces.  

After last year’s legislative session, Florida failed to secure the tax incentive money it needed to lure more movie and television projects to the Sunshine State.

But things could change in 2015. And Palm Beach County lawmakers want to play a starring role in replenishing those funds.

Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota is getting serious about its film program.

The school, which was recently named one of The Hollywood Reporter’s Top 25 film schools, will build a 3,000 square foot professional soundstage and post-production studio.

The future of Florida's film and television industry is uncertain after lawmakers failed to approve funding for a tax credit program that is broke.

That has studios looking at moving production to other states with aggressive incentive programs.

Graham Winick, the city of Miami Beach's film coordinator and a past president of Film Florida, said it was disappointing when the Legislature didn't approve additional funding last year, but industry advocates were confident they could win over lawmakers during the recently concluded session.

Steve Newborn / WUSF

The International Indian Film Academy's 15th annual awards takes place April 24-26 at various spots around the Tampa Bay area.

The event is held in a different country each year, and this is the first time the Bollywood Oscars will be held in the United States. It's expected to draw 800 million TV viewers from around the world.