LISTEN LIVE

Ferguson Riots

For members of the Ferguson, Mo., community, the shooting of two police officers Thursday morning has ratcheted up an anxiety that's already long been simmering. As a manhunt continues Friday, one need only visit the blocks around the Ferguson Police Department to get a sense of that tension.

(This post was last updated at 7 p.m. ET.)

Darren Wilson, the former Ferguson, Mo., police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown last August, will not face federal civil rights charges over the killing. That's according to the Justice Department, which has now released its reviews of both the shooting and the local police department.

While Wilson will avoid federal charges, the Justice Department review found that the Ferguson Police Department engages in "a pattern of unconstitutional policing."

Police in Ferguson, Mo., arrested 15 people overnight amid continued, though mostly peaceful, protests following a grand jury's decision earlier this week not to indict white police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of unarmed black youth Michael Brown.

Small protests were also held in Oakland, Calif., Seattle and Chicago.

Those arrested in Ferguson — all but one residing out-of-state — were charged with disturbing the peace.

Updated at 6:54 a.m.

Public reaction to a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson has ranged from fire and looting close to where Wilson shot Michael Brown to peaceful protests nearby.

Other protests were held in large and small cities and college towns across America on Tuesday; photos from those scenes show a variety of demonstrators, tactics and responses.

Adding his voice to the mounds of grand jury evidence released Monday night by St. Louis County, Darren Wilson, the Ferguson, Mo., police officer who killed Michael Brown, told his side of the story in an interview Tuesday.

Wilson told ABC's George Stephanopoulos that he has "a clean conscience" about the shooting; he also said he's sorry for the loss of life. The shooting led to both violent protests and serious conversations about race and law enforcement.

In a speech in which he said he understands the frustrations of people who feel they're not treated fairly under the law, President Obama also stated, "I have no sympathy at all for destroying your own communities."

The president had been scheduled to speak about immigration policy during his appearance at Chicago's Copernicus Community Center. But he began his remarks by calling for calm in Ferguson, Mo., responding to the fiery unrest that has followed a grand jury's decision not to charge police officer Darren Wilson over the killing of Michael Brown.

This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

Attorney General Eric Holder says "far more must be done to create enduring trust" between police and communities they serve, even as his Justice Department continues to investigate possible discriminatory police actions in Ferguson, Mo.

AP Photo

Smoke billowed from burned-out buildings and sidewalks were strewn with broken glass Tuesday morning after Ferguson erupted over a grand jury’s decision not to indict a white police officer in the killing of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Updated at 5:00 p.m.

Attorneys for the family of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who was shot and killed by Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson, said they had expected Monday's outcome in which a grand jury declined to charge the officer in the fatal shooting.

"We could see what the outcome was going to be, and that is what occurred last night," attorney Benjamin Crump said at a news conference in St. Louis Tuesday.

He said the fact that Wilson was not indicted shows the system is broken.

More Florida police departments are equipping their officers with body cameras. Some cities like Miami Beach even plan to have other types of employees including code enforcement officers wear cameras. And the US Border Patrol will begin testing them on agents next month. In the aftermath of last month’s police shooting in Ferguson, Missouri the devices are garnering support but they’re also raising privacy concerns.

Making Sense of Ferguson Reporter Arrests

Aug 17, 2014
npr.org

Rioting in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson -- after an unarmed teenager was shot to death by police -- has brought media attention the likes of which that small community has never seen.

And, reporters have experienced everything from tear-gassing to arrest as they try to cover the story.