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federal shutdown

Hundreds of thousands of federal employees around the country are returning to work after being furloughed for more than a month. Thousands of others in the federal workforce did work during the 35-day shutdown but didn't get paid.

The Trump administration promises that by Friday federal workers will be paid the two consecutive paychecks that were missed as a result of the government being shuttered.

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

The longest government shutdown in history ended after President Trump signed a bipartisan three-week stopgap funding measure late Friday. Several agencies had been partially shuttered for 35 days.

"I am very proud to announce today that we have reached a deal to end the shutdown and reopen the federal government," Trump said earlier Friday in the White House Rose Garden, announcing the long-awaited bipartisan breakthrough.

Courtesy USCG Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael De Nyse

U.S. Coast Guard members are still on the job, rescuing people and guarding national waters.

But with the government shutdown in effect, they're not getting paid. 

Gov. Scott Blasts Federal Budget Deal

Oct 18, 2013

Gov. Scott's statement on the agreement inked this week in Washington, D.C., puts him firmly in line with a group of tea party-aligned congressional Republicans, mostly in the House, who refused to support the final budget deal because it did not include larger spending cuts.

The Associated Press

Senate leaders announced a last-minute agreement Wednesday to avert a threatened Treasury default and reopen the government after a partial, 16-day shutdown. Congress raced to pass the measure by day’s end.

The Dow Jones industrial average soared on the news that the threat of default was fading, flirting with a 200-point gain in morning trading.

“This is a time for reconciliation,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of the agreement he had forged with the GOP leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

The federal government shutdown that has already led to furloughed employees, closed national parks and commissaries could soon start to ripple through Florida's schools and state government.

The administration of Gov. Rick Scott on Thursday ordered all agencies to refrain from using any state money to cover expenses that are supposed to be picked up by the federal government.

The state has a $74 billion budget, but more than 35 percent of the money comes from federal funds.