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Extreme heat

Heat Index
Union of Concerned Scientists

July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880, the latest in a long line of peaks that scientists say backs up predictions for man-made climate change.

More Rain Could Mean River Flooding Across Tampa Bay

Aug 14, 2019
A Flood Watch remains in effect for Tampa Bay through Friday.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

In anticipation of more heavy rain this week, the National Weather Service in Tampa has issued a Flood Watch for all of west-central Florida through Friday morning, with particular attention being paid to several rivers in the region.'

The Tampa Bay area will have to deal with drenching rains, prompting the National Weather Service to issue a flood watch for the region through Friday.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

First it was the heat, and now it's the rain.

After enduring a few days of scorching conditions, the Tampa Bay area will have to deal with drenching rains, prompting the National Weather Service to issue a flood watch for the region through Friday.

According to Ray Hawthorne, meteorologist with the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, the region has already received nearly 6 inches more rain than normal since June 1.

The morning lows have been so warm, they've also broken a few records across the state.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

The recent heat has been record-setting in parts of Florida, and in some unusual ways.

Sunday's high temperature of 98 degrees in Jacksonville tied its daily record for August 11 set in 2011. This is a type of record one would normally expect during a heat wave.

However, high levels of humidity have prevented the mercury from falling as much as it normally does overnight. The morning lows have been so warm, they’ve also broken a few records across the state.

Sweltering heat gripped much of Florida on Monday.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

It’s the middle of August in Florida, which means we should be accustomed to the sweltering, suffocating heat we’ve been sweating through across the Tampa Bay area – especially since the end of last week.

But if you been thinking these oppressive conditions feel just a bit worse than normal, you’re right.

It turns out that Sunday’s heat levels broke records in some parts of the region, and this trend will continue at least for the next couple of days.

This last May was the hottest ever recorded in the Sunshine State. That was followed by higher-than-average temperatures in June and July. The scorching hot temperatures means thousands of inmates across the state are spending what could potentially be a record-breaking summer without access to air conditioning.

The Florida Department of Corrections operates 50 “major facilities” across the state. Only 18 of them have air conditioning in “most of their housing,” according to the department.

Florida’s heat set record highs last month. The Union of Concerned Scientists says in less than 20 years, Florida will be so hot for so much of the year that it could literally be life threatening. The scientists in a new report say the world must reduce carbon emissions now or face extreme heat that will take lives within decades. 

A report released this week predicts a lot more days of extreme heat - so much that they're being called "killer heat" days. We conclude our three-part series with a plea from scientists for politicians to do something - before it's too late.

Heat Index
Union of Concerned Scientists

By Steve Newborn

In 1995, a heat wave killed more than 700 people in Chicago. It affected mostly elderly, African-American women who lived on their own.

A report released this week shows climate change could mean a lot more days of extreme heat for Florida and Tampa Bay, and with it, the likelihood residents will be exposed to significant health risks.

A report released Tuesday says that the nation will face extremely hot days - along with deaths from killer heat waves - in the near future if carbon emissions aren't reduced. And perhaps not surprisingly, Florida may experience some of its hottest days on record.