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DACA

Immigration advocates say 7,200 Florida children could be harmed if their parents lose Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – or DACA - benefits that allow them to stay in the country. 

The United States Supreme Court will consider oral arguments Nov. 12 in a case brought by the Trump Administration that would take away those benefits. 

Some college students are pushing Florida lawmakers to allow immigrant students access to state financial aid. 

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET

In a federal courtroom in Texas today, the debate over the Trump administration's immigration policies shifted from separated families to another group of young immigrants.

They are the ones who were brought to the United States as children and grew up here. About 700,000 young people were protected from deportation under the Obama-era program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Nearly 600 women were arrested Thursday in one of several demonstrations across the country protesting the Trump administration's treatment of migrant families at the southern border.

Monday was supposed to be the day that DACA ended.

But court rulings have blocked President Trump from phasing out the program, at least for now, and negotiations have stalled out in Congress. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protects undocumented immigrants brought to the country as children from deportation.

DACA recipients and their supporters want to keep the pressure on the White House and Congress to come up with a program to replace DACA.


  South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz is one of a few lawmakers who are bringing Dreamers as their special guests to Tuesday’s State of the Union Address. 

 

Congress ended the federal government shutdown on Monday only after Republicans assured Democrats they would move to pass a DACA bill. DACA means Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – the 800,000 undocumented immigrants who were brought to this country as children. They're also known as Dreamers. Their struggle to avoid deportation – and live here legally – began almost two decades ago, and it's one of the century's most compelling immigration stories.

DREAMERS and activists with the Florida Immigrant Coalition gathered outside Senator Bill Nelson’s office in Coral Gables on Thursday demanding him to vote no on a spending bill that doesn't  include a clean DREAM act.

“A clean DREAM act would basically give a pathway to citizenship to undocumented youth. And it would not include more enforcement or a wall [or] more criminalization for our communities,” said Paola Muñoz, a community organizer for the Florida Immigrant Coalition.

A national teachers union is targeting two South Florida Republicans in an ad campaign pressuring members of Congress to force a vote on a replacement for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

President Donald Trump has announced he’s ending the Obama-era immigration program that allows immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children to obtain work permits and reside here without fear of deportation. Trump has challenged Congress to come up with a different solution for about 800,000 so-called Dreamers.

A Florida Senate Committee passed a measure urging Congress to preserve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA.

Congress, once again, finds itself days away from a potential government shutdown, and a fight over immigration could stand in the way of a deal to prevent it.

"It could happen," Trump told reporters Wednesday. "Democrats are really looking at something that is very dangerous for our country. They are looking at shutting down. They want to have illegal immigrants in many cases, people that we don't want in our country, they want to have illegal immigrants pouring into our country."

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

A Republican congressman from Florida said Tuesday he won't support a year-end spending measure unless Congress passes a solution for immigrants brought into the country illegally as children.

Republicans who might have been leery of supporting the bipartisan Dream Act got a more conservative-friendly option this week in the form of a new bill dubbed the SUCCEED Act (Solution for Undocumented Children through Careers, Employment, Education and Defending our nation).

Photo Courtesy PolitiFact Florida/Miami Herald

The subject of illegal immigration is never far from the front burner of politics, especially in the wake of President Trump's recent decision to look at rescinding DACA. That could revoke the legal status of children brought illegally into the country.

‘Dreamers' Decision Creates Dilemma For Florida Republicans

Sep 6, 2017
Rick Scott (Facebook)

President Donald Trump's decision to do away with his predecessor's policy that benefited hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants known as “dreamers” has put Florida Republicans in a bind.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Tuesday formally announced it will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA — putting an expiration date on the legal protections granted to roughly 800,000 people known as "DREAMers," who entered the country illegally as children.

President Trump issued a statement, saying, "I do not favor punishing children, most of whom are now adults, for the actions of their parents. But we must also recognize that we are nation of opportunity because we are a nation of laws."

President Donald Trump is likely to announce the end of a program that extends legal protections to people who were brought into the U.S. illegally as children, multiple news agencies report.

Undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children face an uncertain future in Florida and across the country as the the federal program that's given them paperwork for school and jobs and shielded them from deportation faces a pivotal moment under the Trump Administration. Trump is expected to decide by Sept. 5 whether to end or renew the program known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Days ahead of President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration, many of the 4,800 international students at the University of South Florida have questions about what the new administration means for their future in America.

Eduardo Padrón has been the president of Miami-Dade College for more than 21 years. In that time, he expanded the college to offer hundreds of degrees to tens of thousands of students, especially for immigrant students, all while keeping education affordable. 

Immigration—or immigration enforcement—has been a signature issue for President-elect Donald Trump. One policy he has vowed to repeal is DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which gives about 750,000 young immigrants the ability to work and go to college here in the U.S. 

Quincy Walters / WUSF News

In 2012, President Obama issued an executive order called the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA -- giving amnesty to children brought into the United States illegally with their families.

And during the campaign, President-Elect Donald Trump said he'll "immediately terminate" two of Obama's executive orders concerning immigration -- one of them being DACA.