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Confederate monuments

A carving depicting the images of Confederate Generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee and president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, is engraved on the side of Stone Mountain.
Emil Moffatt/WABE

A walk along the trails at Stone Mountain Park near Atlanta, Georgia can be peaceful. The sweeping views from the top of the mountain can be breathtaking, and a visit to a new dinosaur exhibit there can be educational.

Protesters gather by the Confederate monument on county courthouse grounds
Photos By Liam Niemeyer/Ohio Valley Resource

The sun was setting on the courthouse square in the rural college town of Murray, Kentucky, after another sweltering July day. The town bills itself as the “friendliest small town in America,” but recent controversy around the removal of a Confederate monument have complicated that image.

Updated at 7:43 a.m. ET

On the eve of Independence Day, President Trump celebrated at the foot of Mount Rushmore National Memorial in Keystone, S.D., with a fireworks display and an impassioned speech against what he called a "new far-left fascism."

President Trump is escalating his fight with Congress over a broad bipartisan effort to rename military installations named for figures from the Confederacy, threatening to veto an annual defense bill if it includes the provision.

The Senate is debating the National Defense Authorization Act, which already includes the provision backed by most members of the Senate panel. Meanwhile, a bipartisan group of House lawmakers is looking to add the change as part of ongoing negotiations for its version of the defense legislation.

Statues and monuments linked to slavery are being taken down — sometimes forcefully by protesters themselves — across the United States as people grapple with the painful history that they often memorialize.

Soldiers gather for a 2019 awards ceremony at Fort Bragg, N.C.
JOSHUA COWDEN / U.S. ARMY

Originally published on June 22, 2020 11:20 am

With the call for changing the names of 10 Southern military bases gaining momentum in Washington, the question is starting to arise in Washington - and outside of it - of what names might replace those of the Confederate generals they now bear.

With the call for changing the names of 10 Southern military bases gaining momentum in Washington, the question is starting to arise in Washington - and outside of it - of what names might replace those of the Confederate generals they now bear.

Renewed calls are ringing out for state leadership to remove the confederate monument from the lawn of Florida’s Historic Capitol in Tallahassee.

“It’s part of a revisionist history used against minorities in our state as a symbol of hatred and false supremacy,” said prominent progressive political consultant Kevin Cate.

Florida Public Archaeology Network

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit aimed at blocking Lakeland from moving a statute honoring Confederate soldiers.

District Judge Virginia Hernandez Covington dismissed the lawsuit this week filed by Confederate rights groups against Lakeland. The city plans to move a statue of a Confederate soldier from a park where it was erected in 1910 to a veterans cemetery where it will be placed among statues honoring the dead from other wars.

Atlanta is changing the names of three streets that echo the city's Civil War past.

Confederate Avenue will become United Avenue, East Confederate Avenue will become United Avenue S.E. and Confederate Court will become Trestletree Court on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

A Department of State panel has agreed to allow a Confederate General statue currently in the U.S. Capitol to call a Florida museum its new home. But, that decision is receiving some pushback.

Josh Hallett/Flickr

More than a month after the Lakeland City Commission voted to move the Confederate memorial from the center of downtown, fundraising has slowed and tensions continue.

Massive hurricanes, corrupt politicians and the tragic death of a famous manatee – there was a lot of big news in Florida this year. This week on Florida Matters we talk with local journalists about some of 2017’s top local stories.