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Charlottesville

This week, four men connected to a white supremacist group were arrested and charged with rioting at last year's Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Hundreds of neo-Nazis and members of the alt-right had gathered there ostensibly to protest against the removal of monuments honoring Civil War Confederate generals. The rally turned fatal when an avowed white supremacist drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters – leaving one woman dead and several other people injured.

Photo courtesy of Southern Poverty Law Center on Campus@USF

A University of South Florida student is speaking out about his past in the white nationalist movement.

Scott Ernest, an undergraduate student in public health at USF Tampa, said he first got involved in the movement online in 2004 and eventually moved to Montana to join a white nationalist organization. Now, Ernest advises young people who are thinking about leaving the alt-right, particularly those who are LGBT.

Updated at 10:05 p.m. ET

A small group of about 25 white supremacist demonstrators rallied next to the White House on Sunday, one year after the "Unite the Right" demonstration by the same organizer turned deadly in Charlottesville, Va.

The demonstrators have since left D.C. via Metro, and WAMU's Elly Yu reports that counterprotesters have headed home, too.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

In downtown Charlottesville, Va., authorities are limiting car and pedestrian traffic, dozens of police in riot gear are patrolling a park in the city's center and some residents have left town in case the weekend turns violent.

The National Park Service has approved an initial request for organizers to hold a second "Unite the Right" rally, this time across the street from the White House in August — one year after white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Va.

Florida Governor Rick Scott is repudiating President Donald Trump’s comments but not the president himself.  Trump in recent days has equated the actions of white nationalists with those of the men and women who marched in opposition.

UF Says No To White Nationalist Speaker

Aug 16, 2017
V@s (Wikimedia Commons)

The University of Florida is refusing to allow white nationalist leader Richard Spencer to speak on campus next month, citing “serious concerns” about safety in the aftermath of a deadly weekend clash in Charlottesville, Va.

The Florida father of a protester killed when a car plowed into peaceful protesters in Charlottesville says his daughter was passionate about equality for all. Mark Heyer of Cocoa Beach tells Florida Today he's proud of his daughter. He is calling for forgiveness. 

Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran is vowing to continue to fight what he calls “evil” ideologies. Speaking to reporters Monday, he stated the evils of “Neo-Nazism and white supremacy” need to be stomped out—after the violence that erupted at a protest in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Updated on Monday, 08/14 at 5 p.m. to include comments from local activists, council members.

Jacksonville City Council President Anna Lopez-Brosche is calling for the city’s Confederate statues, memorials and monuments to be moved off of public property and into museums or other educational facilities.

The violent confrontation in Charlottesville and its aftermath have galvanized elected leaders on both sides of the aisle.  Florida Democrats are planning voter registration rallies in response. 

The University of Florida is coordinating with local and state law-enforcement officials in anticipation of the potential appearance in Gainesville of a white nationalist leader affiliated with this weekend's deadly confrontation in Charlottesville, Va.

UF President Kent Fuchs sent an email to staff this weekend, alerting them that National Policy Institute President Richard Spencer, who made an appearance at the Charlottesville event, could speak at the university next month.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

A day after a rally of white nationalists turned violent in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said there is "no place" for such hateful people in the United States as he called on President Trump to more strongly condemn the perpetrators.

Updated Aug. 12 at 10:04 p.m. ET

Three people died and about 35 were injured in a day of violence that began with clashes at a white nationalist rally on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said.

One of those killed was a 32-year-old female pedestrian who was hit by a car that plowed into marchers, authorities said. The driver of the car, James Alex Fields is being held on charges including second degree murder. Police say he's from Ohio.