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A jury's $289 million award to a former school groundskeeper who said Monsanto's Roundup left him dying of cancer will bolster thousands of pending cases and open the door for countless people who blame their suffering on the weed killer, the man's lawyers said.

More than 45 fire departments throughout the state have received decontamination kits that firefighters can use to clean cancer-causing substances off their skin and gear. 

Florida is not doing enough to prevent cancer, according to a new report by the American Cancer Society’s political-action committee.

There's encouraging news for cancer treatments that stimulate the immune system to attack cancer cells. A widely used immunotherapy drug appears to be useful in a greater number of patients with lung cancer.

The drug called Keytruda, or pembrolizumab, is already prescribed to a group of patients who have a type of malignancy called non-small cell lung cancer. It's the principal form of lung cancer and found most commonly in people who have smoked.

An experimental vaccine could be on the market for ovarian-cancer patients as soon as 2022, according to the Jacksonville-based company that makes it.

The River City’s Mayo Clinic is participating in the trials.

A Hillsborough County teen who had been battling a rare form of cancer has died less than a month after marrying his high school sweetheart.

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There has been concerns for years over a disproportionate number of cancer cases among former and current students, faculty and staff at a Bradenton high school. That has led the Manatee County School Board and Board of Commissioners to request a study from the Florida Department of Health.

Bayshore High School has been in operation since 1962, but the district’s electronic records of students only go back to 1985 and to 1993 for the staff.

Dying Teen To Get Last Wish: To Marry High School Girlfriend

Jan 26, 2018
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When doctors told a dying Hillsborough County teen there was nothing else they can do for him, he started checking off his wish list. Now there's one last item: marrying his high school sweetheart.

Roughly one in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime, which is why screening for the disease is so important.

But some women can't afford a yearly mammogram.

A statewide program that screens for breast and cervical cancer has helped thousands of low income women between the ages of 50 and 64 with early detection. Only there isn’t enough money to make it through the year.

Less of the research presented at a prominent cancer conference is supported by the National Institutes of Health, a development that some of the country’s top scientists see as a worrisome trend.

An investigation into a suspected "cancer cluster" at the site of two demolished schools will involve an independent review of environmental testing dating back decades and a request by health authorities to see patient medical records.

Kathy Kino has been helping people during some of their most vulnerable times since she began volunteering at a hospital when she was 13. She worked as a trauma nurse and a hospital chaplain for more than 15 years, and now she’s a nursing professor.

This is National Nurses Week, and Kino spoke with WLRN about how becoming a patient herself changed the way she thinks about her profession:

President Barack Obama has signed into law legislation that makes new investments in cancer research and battling drug abuse.


Stephanie Sofronsky was just 23, close to graduation from Florida Atlantic University, when she learned she had lymphoma.

She didn’t want to believe it. So she sought a second opinion from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa and a third opinion from Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, state records show. Moffitt double-checked with the National Cancer Institute. 

It's a balmy Saturday morning at the Rotary campground in Brandon. Dark clouds are threatening to unleash the fury of a Florida summer rainstorm, so the canoes and kayaks have been packed up for the day.

Now, the teens are just hanging out. Some are getting their nails and hair done, others are doing arts and crafts.

But this isn't your typical summer camp.

  Mindfulness meditation is designed to settle and ground you in the present moment.

That's something that Carole Kinder had a difficult time with after her husband was diagnosed with cancer.

Courtesy Mary Lumapas / "Share Your Spare" Facebook page

Mary Lumapas is in her third year studying cell and molecular biology at the University of South Florida, but, because of health problems, she’s a sophomore.

You see, for most of her life, the 21-year-old from Lecanto has been battling cancer.

“Three cancer diagnoses, two of which are Wilms tumor, the last one was myelodysplastic syndrome, which is also (called) MDS,” Lumapas explained, running down her list of major ailments.

One of the most intense debates in men's health has flared again: How often should men get screened for prostate cancer?

This debate has simmered since 2012, when the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force shocked many patients and doctors by recommending against routine prostate cancer screening.

A Miami-based blog is featuring fashion shoots with women who have battled cancer. It’s called Wear To Now. The women get photo shoots with professional hair, makeup and styling for free. The blog is trying to help women embrace their scars.

Lori Cuellar posed for the camera at Matheson Hammock Park. The morning sun was hitting her. Biscayne Bay and the Miami skyline were in the background.

Steve Newborn / WUSF

On April 5, WUSF-TV will air the first part of the new Ken Burns’ documentary “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies.”  

In the coming weeks, public television stations across Florida will air a new documentary by Ken Burns. "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies" aims to tell the complete story of cancer, from the first accounts from ancient Egypt to modern research facilities, and the stories of patients.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Saturday was a record-setting day for Miles for Moffitt, both in terms of participants and in money raised for cancer research.

Around 7,500 people took part in the event, raising more than $594,000 for research at the Moffitt Cancer Center. Since starting in 2006, Miles for Moffitt has raised more than $2 million.

Moffitt Cancer Center

(Story has been updated with Miriam Zimm's status for Miles for Moffitt in the third paragraph)

When Miles for Moffitt steps off on Saturday, May 10, Miriam Zimms will once again be there.

A bout with breast cancer four years ago didn’t stop her. Neither will last year’s bone cancer scare that saw surgeons remove a large section of her pelvis and replace it with a bone from a cadaver.

"I know that it will be an incredibly different type of walk for me this year because of the fact that I don’t have full mobility and I cannot fully walk on both my legs, so it will be a very different experience," said Zimms, who's undergone six months of physical therapy. She plans to walk about 300 feet or so at the event using either crutches or a walker, and her husband will push her the rest of the one mile in her wheelchair.

She's taking part, not just for herself but also for her loved ones. Her team of walkers and runners, the Guatemalan Globes, is named for her birth country and for the four other women in her family who’ve also battled breast cancer, including her mother, who died from the disease in 1992.

An estimated seven thousand participants are expected to join Miriam in taking part in Miles for Moffitt, a series of races and walks that raises money for research at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center. 

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

You wouldn't know it by looking at her, but Josalyn Kaldenberg has a bionic arm.

Even if you looked hard at her right arm, you'd only see a small scar, a barely noticeable, faint line that starts around her elbow and then runs up her arm. It looks like it could be the result of an injury any 11-year-old like Josalyn would have - maybe she fell off a swing or got injured rough-housing with her four younger siblings back home in Woodward, Iowa.

But that scar is actually historic. You see, under that scar, Josalyn Kaldenberg has an expandable, prosthetic upper arm bone - the first of its kind in a child in the United States.

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn made a lot of specific promises when he ran for that office, from improved parks and public spaces to incentives to get police officers to live in the city, and more. 

How has he done on keeping those promises?

Jury selection is set to begin for the second trial of a Florida man accused of killing a Georgia teenager during an argument over loud music outside a Jacksonville convenience store.

Attorneys for 47-year-old Michael Dunn want to move the trial away from Jacksonville, citing widespread publicity about the case. Circuit Judge Russell Healey has said he'll decide whether to move the trial during jury selection.

Earlier, jurors found Dunn guilty of attempted second-degree murder and firing into an occupied vehicle. They deadlocked on the first-degree murder charge.

A community outreach worker from Tampa's Moffitt Cancer Center was honored this morning as a  "Champion of Change" by the Obama Administration.

A community outreach worker from Moffitt Cancer Center will be honored Tuesday by the Obama Administration in Washington, D.C. for improving public health in Tampa Bay's Hispanic community. 

Myriam Escobar is one of eight people who will be recognized as a "Champion of Change" at the White House ceremony. The White House website will have a live stream at 10 a.m. 

Lottie Watts

It’s not a prescription that a doctor can write. It's not something insurance will usually pay for. But more patients are finding out how horseback riding, or even just being around the animals, can help them feel better. 

Mike O’Neill is beginning treatment for prostate cancer at Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology. During a recent appointment, he saw a brochure that advertised a visit to Rockin’ Horse Farm in New Port Richey.  

The Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk has been canceled in seven locations, including Tampa Bay, after the organization lost some of its financial support and find less-expensive ways to raise money. As the Tampa Bay Times reports, the non-profit came under fire last year after it announced it would stop awarding grants to Planned Parenthood for breast cancer education and screening.

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