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alcohol abuse

More Americans are ordering more rounds, and that's leading to more funerals, according to a new study on alcohol-related deaths.

Looking at data from the National Center for Health Statistics, researchers estimate deaths from alcohol-related problems have more than doubled over the past nearly 20 years.

Death certificates spanning 2017 indicate nearly 73,000 people died in the U.S because of liver disease and other alcohol-related illnesses. That is up from just under 36,000 deaths in 1999.

man and woman hold hands, drinking
Pexel

Drinking is one of the top reasons for divorce in married couples.

And while alcohol can be a problem for couples of all ages, a psychology researcher at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg says there are ways to work through it.

Some who have given up booze altogether join "sober sometimes" friends to enjoy nonalcoholic drinks at Sans Bar in Austin, Texas.
Julia Robinson for NPR

Five men have accepted a plea deal and will serve jail time for the hazing death of a Florida State University student.

Florida State University has lifted a ban prohibiting alcohol at sanctioned Greek life and student organization events. 

Florida lawmakers want to give officers more authority to use blood tests in misdemeanor DUI investigations. But some are sounding the alarm on the plan’s unintended consequences.

If you drink more alcohol than you want to or should, you're not alone. A nationwide survey by the National Institutes of Health found that 28 percent of adults in the U.S. are heavy drinkers or drink more than is recommended.

Yet, most heavy drinkers don't get the help they need.

Women are drinking more heavily, and alcohol is behind a growing number of their deaths, according to a Washington Post analysis of federal health data.

The number of white women dying from alcohol-related problems rose 130 percent nationwide since 1999; for Hispanic women, alcohol-related deaths grew by 30 percent in that same time frame. Federal health data shows the prevalence of binge drinking among women up by more than 40 percent since the late 1990s, leading to more ER visits and a growing number of accidents, injuries, and chronic diseases.