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2019 hurricane season

Several inches of rain have already fallen in many communities of west-central Florida this week, and with more anticipated over the next two days, the risk of flooding will continue.

A Flood Watch has been issued for parts of Florida’s Big Bend and inland areas of North Florida through Saturday evening. Flood Watches also continue for much of west-central Florida and southeast Florida through Friday evening.

3 to 7 inches of rain has fallen near the Nature Coast and north of Tampa since Monday, according to estimates from doppler radar and several reporting stations.

More than 85 percent of all hurricane activity in the Atlantic Basin occurs after the middle of August.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

More than 85 percent of all hurricane activity in the Atlantic Basin occurs after the middle of August.

Some consider Aug. 15 as the “real” start to hurricane season. To others, like former FEMA administrator Craig Fugate, it’s synonymous with the start of football season.

As the planet heats up, polar ice melts, seas rise and Biblical-size rains become more frequent, hurricanes are expected to get wetter and more intense.

But less certain is how much climate change is making these fierce storms, which target Florida more than any other U.S. state, more punishing now.

Updated projections released on Tuesday predict 13 more named storms will form in 2019, with six being hurricanes and two classified as major hurricanes.
NOAA

It’s time to stock up on sandbags.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced today that the chances for an above-normal hurricane season have increased by 15% since May.

Another round of potentially powerful round of rain and thunderstorms is expected to usher out the work week.
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

After a round of powerful storms produced widespread heavy rain and localized street flooding across portions of the Tampa Bay area on Thursday, another round of rain is expected to usher out the work week.

Atlantic Comes Alive: Wave To Drench Florida As Next Tropical System Looms

Aug 1, 2019
A tropical wave off the Florida coast will elevate our rain chances, while a system in the Atlantic is likely to develop into a tropical system.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

The most active part of the hurricane season often begins in August. Right on-cue, at least one tropical system is likely to form in the Atlantic by the upcoming weekend.

Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center are now monitoring two tropical waves that don’t appear to have much chance of developing into tropical systems, but still serve as a reminder that we are in the midst of hurricane season.
NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center are now monitoring two tropical waves that don’t appear to have much chance of developing into tropical systems, but still serve as a reminder that we are in the midst of hurricane season.

Forecasters continue to keep an eye on a wave in the northeastern Caribbean that was tracking toward Florida on Monday. The track, however, has shifted to the east, and appears likely to approach the state by the weekend before skirting the East Coast.

Update Monday 2:00 PM ET:

The tropical wave over the eastern Caribbean Sea is moving slowly west-northwestward and it’s not becoming better organized yet.

After a stormy week, sunshine begins to emerge in Tampa early Friday morning.
CARL LISCIANDRELLO

The Tampa Bay region will have to endure one more potentially stormy afternoon before normal summertime conditions return in time for the weekend.

Early risers are waking up to a bit more sunshine than in the last few days, with blue skies peeking through some light clouds.

Storms moving in off the Gulf of Mexico produced a wet Thursday morning commute.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

The cold front that had promised to create soggy conditions over Tampa Bay is firmly in control, stalled over the region and dumping heavy rain for the Thursday morning commute.

The good news? Things return to normal this weekend, meaning storms starting inland and drifting toward the west coast in the afternoon.

The wet morning conditions are fueled by the stalled front, combined with deep tropical moisture and winds from the southwest that are driving the storms off the Gulf of Mexico, according to the National Weather Service.

Forecasters are monitoring a cold front that could pose a much more serious impact in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and the Tampa Bay area.
NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

While Tropical Depression Three appears poised to fizzle out as it spins off the east coast of Florida and moves away from the state, forecasters are monitoring a cold front that could pose a much more serious impact in the northern Gulf of Mexico – and the Tampa Bay area.

El Niño Fading as Heart of Hurricane Season Approaches

Jul 17, 2019

The heart of hurricane season is approaching, and the atmosphere is signaling that the Atlantic Basin could soon become more active.

No development is expected over the next week to ten days. However, later this summer and fall, global-scale climate factors are changing. And this could make conditions more favorable for tropical storm or hurricane development.

Forecasters examine many features when forecasting for the tropics. They include: wind shear, water temperatures, atmospheric dust concentrations, moisture in the air, and global atmospheric circulations.

Updated at 8:26 p.m. ET

Though life-threatening flooding still poses a threat to Louisiana, weakening winds on Sunday marked Barry's downgrade from a tropical storm to a tropical depression.

The National Weather Service forecasts that the center of the storm will continue to move through northwest Louisiana toward Arkansas through Monday.

Updated at 4:32 p.m. ET

Barry reached Louisiana's central coast, near Intracoastal City, on Saturday morning as a Category 1 hurricane, the National Hurricane Center said, before weakening to a tropical storm.

The storm has already brought flooding to New Orleans, where tornado warnings have been issued.

Residents across other parts of Louisiana have also been bracing for flooding — forecasters predict up to 25 inches of rain across much of southern Louisiana and southwest Mississippi, leading to dangerous, life threatening flooding.

The Gulf of Mexico disturbance that dumped as much as 8 inches (20 centimeters) of rain in just three hours over parts of metro New Orleans was forecast to strengthen into a tropical depression Thursday, then a tropical storm called Barry Thursday night,
NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

Associated Press

A potential tropical storm brewing in the Gulf of Mexico presents twin troubles for coastal Louisiana and Mississippi — the possibility that the flooded Mississippi River will be lapping at the tops of levees this weekend, and a danger of flash floods like the one that unexpectedly walloped New Orleans on Wednesday.

The low-pressure system that dipped into the Gulf of Mexico from Georgia strengthened into Tropical Storm Barry on Thursday morning and continues to make its way west, on a projected path toward Louisiana as a potential Category 1 hurricane.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

By Carl Lisciandrello

The low-pressure system that dipped into the Gulf of Mexico from Georgia strengthened into Tropical Storm Barry on Thursday morning and continues to make its way west, on a projected path toward Louisiana as a potential Category 1 hurricane.

Updated projections released on Tuesday predict 13 more named storms will form in 2019, with six being hurricanes and two classified as major hurricanes.
NOAA / NOAA

By Carl Lisciandrello

Researchers at Colorado State University are maintaining their prediction of a near-average 2019 hurricane season.

A tropical storm watch has been issued for parts of Mississippi and Louisiana as a system that has moved into the Gulf of Mexico is poised to form into a tropical depression by Thursday and could become a hurricane before the weekend.
FLORIDA PUBLIC RADIO EMERGENCY NETWORK

The National Hurricane Center has classified the tropical low over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico as a “potential tropical cyclone” (PTC), and it could become a hurricane before hitting Louisiana this weekend.

Heavy rain and potential flooding is in the forecast this week across parts of Florida, and a tropical storm might even form nearby.

Regardless of its tropical status, several inches of rain are likely to fall in Tampa Bay and near Florida’s Gulf Coast this week. Nearby seas will also grow unsettled, with minor coastal flooding and multiple beach hazards expected.

Empty cots line a room in the Mike Fasano Regional Hurricane Shelter in Pasco Co. ahead of Hurricane Michael in Oct. 2018.
Pasco County Media Relations & Communications

Hurricane season has started and it helps to be prepared for any storms that may happen. While counties have shelters for severe storms, officials say they are meant as a last resort and should be secondary to evacuation.  

Today marks the official start of the 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season, and the second named storm of the year could already be developing. However, it poses no current threat to the United States.

Anyone who was in Panama City, Fla., last year when Hurricane Michael hit has a story to tell. Christina Harding rode out the storm with her mother, daughter and two nephews. "It was crazy," she says. "We had to tie the door shut because Michael was trying to come into the house with us, which was not what we wanted. It was like bam, bam, bam, bam. Like somebody trying to get in, you know?"

When Hurricane Michael struck the Panhandle of Florida last October, Keith and Susan Koppelman were huddled in the bathroom of their small, two-bedroom rental trailer just north of Panama City.

"When the winds came we both started praying," says Keith, 49. "I thought, 'Oh my God, this is a big storm.' "

After four hours, they finally emerged to survey the damage. The storm's 160-mile-per-hour winds had torn off the porch and peeled away the trailer's tin siding.

Gallons of drinking water sits on shelves.
Bobbie O'Brien / WUSF Public Media

Hurricane season started June 1 and officials are sending out their annual message: it's imperative to know what to do before, during, and after a storm.

Hillsborough County evacuation zones.
Hillsboroughcounty.org

Hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30. Emergency management officials say it's important residents know which evacuation zone they live in. Florida residents should have an evacuation plan in place before a storm is on the radar. 

  

When counties mandate evacuations, they will do it by zones A-E. The zones are set based on a home’s vulnerability to deadly storm surge, with Zone A being most vulnerable. Evacuation zones are not the same as FEMA flood zone designations.

Generator
OPEI

Hurricane season is here and Florida lawmakers want to help give your wallet a break when preparing this year. Through next Thursday, storm supplies like flashlights and generators will be tax-free to help families get prepared for the 2019 storm season.

Federal weather forecasters are predicting a "near normal" number of storms this hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through November 1.

Between nine and 15 named storms, including includes tropical storms, are predicted to form in the Atlantic this year, said Neil Jacobs, acting administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Subtropical Storm Andrea's projected path as of 6 p.m. Monday.
Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

The National Hurricane Center has begun advisories on Subtropical Storm Andrea, the first named storm of the 2019 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

The first tropical storm of the year may be forming in the Atlantic, even though the Atlantic Hurricane Season doesn't officially start until June 1.

National Hurricane Center forecasters said, according to a special statement issued Monday afternoon, that there is a 70 percent chance a tropical or subtropical system will form a few hundred miles southwest of Bermuda in the next 48 hours. A Hurricane Hunter Aircraft flew into the area of disturbed weather, referred to by Meteorologists as “Invest 90”, Monday afternoon. A second flight is also scheduled Tuesday, if necessary.

Many residents in the southeast U.S. and along the Gulf Coast are already thinking about the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season, which begins on June 1. Last year brought two of the most destructive storms to ever hit the U.S.: Hurricane Florence and Hurricane Michael.

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