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Report details climate change's imminent impact to Tampa Bay, says cost of doing nothing is dire

A view of the University of Tampa campus on the banks of the Hillsborough River in Tampa
Thomas Iacobucci
/
WUSF Public Media
A view of the University of Tampa campus on the banks of the Hillsborough River.

Sea-level rise threatens the more than three million people who live in Tampa, St. Petersburg and Clearwater metro areas — nearly five million in the entire region.

This week on Florida Matters, we explore climate change's impact in the Tampa Bay region and how some cities are planning to adapt.

Sea-level rise threatens the more than three million people who live in Tampa, St. Petersburg and Clearwater metro areas — and the nearly five million in the entire region.

So officials in St. Petersburg and Tampa have turned to multi-billion dollar solutions like raising buildings and building sea walls.

To find out more about the cities' plans, host Matthew Peddie spoke with Sharon Wright, the sustainability manager for the city of St. Petersburg, and Whit Remer, the sustainability and resilience officer for the city of Tampa, for the first half of the episode.

Later on, Peddie talks with Maya Burke, assistant director of the Tampa Bay Estuary Program, about the environmental impact of a changing climate on Tampa Bay and other waterways across the region.

You can listen to the full conversations by clicking on the “Listen” button above. Or you can listen on the WUSF app under “Programs & Podcasts.”

Hi there! I’m Dinorah Prevost and I’m the producer of Florida Matters, WUSF's weekly public affairs show. That basically means that I plan, record and edit the interviews we feature on the show.
I am the host of WUSF’s weekly public affairs show Florida Matters, where I get to indulge my curiosity in people and explore the endlessly fascinating stories that connect this community.