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We highlight the latest Unequal Shots story on African Americans and mental health during the pandemic

Man sits in a barber chair with an apron on while a barber cuts his hair. Other man sit in chairs around them.
OCTAVIO JONES
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Antonio Brown, owner of Central Station Barbershop & Grooming, cuts S. Kent Butler's hair as they chat with other men about mental health.

Steve Newborn talks with Stephanie Colombini, who wrote the story, as well as two community advocates.

This week, we look at the latest from WUSF’s ongoing Unequal Shots project.

The pandemic continues to stress the mental health of many people. But it's been especially hard for some Black Americans, who have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus and already faced barriers to care.

First, host Steve Newborn talks with Stephanie Colombini, who wrote the story, and Dr. Angela Hill of USF’s Taneja College of Pharmacy.

RELATED: The pandemic strained mental health for Black Americans. It’s also amplifying calls for change

Later on, he speaks with LaDonna Butler, founder of the Well for Life in St. Petersburg. Butler, a licensed mental health counselor who has a doctorate in counselor education and supervision, was featured in Colombini’s story.

She organized a weekend-long summit this past summer called "Healing While Black" to raise awareness about mental health for people of color in the Tampa Bay area. Held over four days, the event took place in different spaces including a barber shop and a community block party to create a safe space for tough conversations about mental health.

In these additional excerpts from her interview with Newborn, Butler talks about the impact that The Well for Life and events like “Healing While Black” have on the local African American community.

On the rarity of places like The Well for Life for people of color
On the impact of events like the Healing While Black for communities

You can read more about the Unequal Shots series here.

And you can listen to Steve’s conversations with Colombini, Hill and Butler by clicking on the “Listen” button. Or you can listen on the WUSF app under “Programs & Podcasts.”

Hi there! I’m Dinorah Prevost and I’m the producer of Florida Matters, WUSF's weekly public affairs show. That basically means that I plan, record and edit the interviews we feature on the show.
Steve Newborn is a WUSF reporter and producer at WUSF covering environmental issues and politics in the Tampa Bay area.