© 2022 All Rights reserved WUSF
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
WUSF is part of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, which provides up-to-the minute weather and news reports during severe weather events on radio, online and on social media for 13 Florida Public Media stations. It’s available on WUSF 89.7 FM, online at WUSFNews.org and through the free Florida Storms app, which provides geotargeted live forecasts, information about evacuation routes and shelters, and live local radio streams.

NASA launch of moon rocket delayed again by tropical weather

FILE - The NASA moon rocket slated for the Artemis mission to the moon rolls back to the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. On Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022, NASA announced it is again postponing the launch of its new moon rocket because of a storm threatening the Florida coast. NASA was aiming for a launch attempt this weekend _ just after midnight on Sunday. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
John Raoux
/
AP
The NASA moon rocket slated for the Artemis mission to the moon rolls back to the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022, in Cape Canaveral. On Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022, NASA announced it is again postponing the launch of its new moon rocket because of a storm threatening the state.

NASA is again postponing the launch of its new moon rocket because of a storm threatening the state.

Fuel leaks have kept the rocket grounded since August. Then Hurricane Ian forced the rocket back to the hangar at Kennedy Space Center at the end of September.

The rocket was moved back to the pad last week, and NASA was aiming for a launch attempt early Monday.

But on Tuesday, the space agency said it was delaying the launch until at least next Wednesday because of Tropical Storm Nicole, which is expected to hit Florida's Atlantic coastline as a Category 1 hurricane on Wednesday.

The space center was under a hurricane warning but NASA is keeping the rocket at the launch pad. NASA said the rocket is designed to withstand heavy rains and high wind.

The $4.1 billion mission will send an empty crew capsule around the moon and back in a flight test before astronauts climb aboard in a couple years. It is NASA’s biggest step yet to get astronauts back on the moon by 2025. The space agency is nearing the 50th anniversary of its last human moon landing: Apollo 17 in December 1972.
Copyright 2022 WLRN 91.3 FM. To see more, visit WLRN 91.3 FM.

WUSF 89.7 depends on donors for the funding it takes to provide you the most trusted source of news and information here in town, across our state, and around the world. Support WUSF now by giving monthly, or make a one-time donation online.