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Stephanie Colombini

Reporter

Stephanie Colombini joined WUSF Public Media in December 2016 as Producer of Florida Matters, WUSF’s public affairs show. She’s also a reporter for WUSF’s Health News Florida project.

Stephanie was born and raised just outside New York City. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx, where she got her start in radio at NPR member station WFUV in 2012. In addition to reporting and anchoring, Stephanie helped launch the news department’s first podcast series, Issues Tank.

Prior to joining the WUSF family, Stephanie spent a year reporting for CBS Radio’s flagship station WCBS Newsradio 880 in Manhattan. Her assignments included breaking news stories such as the 2016 bombings in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood and Seaside Park, NJ and political campaigns. As part of her job there, she was forced to – and survived – a night of reporting on New Year’s Eve in Times Square.

Her work in feature reporting and podcast production has earned her awards from the Public Radio News Directors, Inc. and the Alliance for Women in Media.

While off-the-clock, you might catch Stephanie at a rock concert, on a fishing boat or anywhere that serves delicious food.

Contact Stephanie by emailing her at scolombini@wusf.org or follow her on Twitter @steph_colombini.

Construction in downtown Tampa
Daylina Miller / WUSF Public Media

The Tampa City Council will consider changing some of its parking requirements for developers at a meeting on January 10.

Supporters of the proposal say it would help boost the city's housing stock.

It's 2019. As WUSF prepares to bring you the news you rely on this year, we’re looking back at some of the station's big moments in 2018 through the lens of Florida Matters.


The year 2018 is almost over, and Florida Matters is looking back at the stories that made headlines in our region this year.


Flickr

Alternative kinds of housing like shipping containers and tiny houses are quickly growing in popularity. Could they help relieve some of the pressure from the affordable housing crunch? 


Roberto Roldan / WUSF Public Media

On a recent afternoon, 71-year-old Milton Malphus walked into the community room of his senior apartment building to get some lunch. Sporting a flat-rimmed hat, basketball sneakers and a T-shirt covered in pineapples, Malphus said he dresses as young as he feels: 17.

Cathy Carter / WUSF Public Media

Back in October, hundreds of Hillsborough County residents packed the pews of Tampa's First Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

For many people struggling to afford rent in Tampa, owning a home could provide more space, more stability and sometimes even a lower monthly cost.

Jeanette Abrahamsen / USF Zimmerman School of Advertising & Mass Communications

Last month, the first installment of our series, "Telling Tampa Bay Stories," took us to Plant City, where we heard stories about the history and development of the Hillsborough County community.

This week's Florida Matters highlights some of the places and events that make Plant City special.


Jeanette Abrahamsen

This week on Florida Matters we focus on the places and events that make Plant City special, like the Plant City Photo Archives and History Center.

A film crew at work
Film Tampa Bay

This week on Florida Matters we talk about how the state’s film industry has fared since the loss of a tax incentive program and how it can survive in the future.

Film Tampa Bay

A new report from Florida TaxWatch says the state may lose its film industry if it doesn't bring back an incentive program for production.


Wikimedia Commons

Negative experiences with health care have caused some minority patients, particularly African American men, to distrust the medical system.

WUSF Public Media

Transitioning out of the military can be tough, but some veterans are finding a new role in civilian life as business owners.


People board a HART bus.
HART

Starting Jan. 1, Hillsborough County residents will pay an 8.5 percent sales tax, the highest in the state.

Voters approved two referenda this week to raise taxes for transportation improvements and school repairs.

Flickr

This week on Florida Matters we're talking about how the state's film industry has fared since it ended a tax incentive program in 2016.

Boyzell Hosey / Tampa Bay Times

Story Days in Tampa Bay recently hosted its fifth annual festival in St. Petersburg. This week on Florida Matters we hear excerpts from a performance  that reflects on Hurricanes Irma and Maria a year after the storms.

denn/Flickr

Local philanthropist and entrepreneur Dr. Kiran Patel has invested $60 million dollars in a medical device company that plans to relocate its headquarters to Tampa.


Florida Matters is hosting a special panel discussion about veteran entrepreneurs in front of a live audience in St. Petersburg and we want you to join us.

WMFE

The Pulse nightclub shooting on June 12, 2016 was, at the time, the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history, leaving 49 dead.

What if more victims could have lived? This year a peer-reviewed study concluded 16 victims died with potentially survivable wounds.


WMFE

49 people were killed in the Pulse Nightclub shooting in 2016. But an investigation from Health News Florida's Abe Aboraya and Pro Publica finds some people may have survived if paramedics had been allowed inside the club sooner.

This week on Florida Matters we hear that story and talk about how response efforts have changed since the massacre.


Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

More and more Floridians every week are signing up for access to medical marijuana, and with over 100,000 patients already on the registry, there is clearly money to be made.

Marijuana plants
Mark, flickr

Medical marijuana is becoming increasingly available in Florida despite ongoing court battles over state regulations for the young industry. We're talking with people who work in the business this week on Florida Matters.

Daylina Miller and Mark Schreiner/WUSF News

When it comes to health care, Democratic candidate for Governor Andrew Gillum and his Republican opponent Ron DeSantis couldn't be further apart.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Tampa lawyer Ryan Torrens is back on the Democratic ballot in the race for Florida Attorney General, at least for now.


Hand dropping ballot into a box.
Drew McKissick / Flickr

Advocates for Puerto Ricans who moved to Florida after they were displaced by Hurricane Maria have filed a federal lawsuit demanding 32 counties in the state provide voting materials in Spanish ahead of the November election. 


Florida’s primary election is Tuesday and you can follow the action here on WUSF.

We’ll bring you election news throughout the day as voters cast their ballots and host live coverage that evening during a special Florida Matters at 8 p.m.

WLRN

The race for governor is not the only statewide political contest during primary season. Republicans and Democrats will also choose their favorite candidate to run for the state's top consumer watchdog: the Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services.


WLRN

The race for governor isn't the only statewide political contest during primary season. Florida Republicans and Democrats will also choose their favorite candidate to run for the state's top prosecutor, the Attorney General.


FL AP Broadcasters

In recent months, journalism groups have been recognizing news outlets across the country for outstanding work done in 2017, and WUSF has garnered multiple awards.

This week on Florida Matters we highlight some of the award-winning journalism produced by our WUSF news team.


WUSF Public Media

Carson Cooper was a radio guy, through and through.

While most people know him best as the longtime host of WUSF’s Morning Edition and Florida Matters, his sonic roots ran deep. This week on Florida Matters, we’re remembering our friend and colleague who died recently at the age of 58 – and the stories he shared with all of us.


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