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Sandra Averhart

Sandra Averhart has been News Director at WUWF since 1996. Her first job in broadcasting was with (then) Pensacola radio station WOWW107-FM, where she worked 11 years.  Sandra, who is a native of Pensacola, earned her B.S. in Communication from Florida State University.

For several years, Sandra was co-host of “Inside UWF” on WUWF TV. Also, she has partnered with WSRE TV to serve as co-host of their “Rally” candidate forums, most recently in 2012. Sandra also lends her voice to the University of West Florida athletics program.  She has worked as public address announcer for Men’s and Women’s Basketball, and continues to “work the mic” at UWF Volleyball and Softball games. Along the way, she has been P-A announcer for four NCAA Division II national championships, to include two each in volleyball and softball.

In her spare time, Sandra continues to enjoy playing softball. She lives in Milton with her husband Charles and two dogs, Beau and Mollie.

In June 1970, Lawton Chiles was completing a 1,000-mile walk across Florida. The trek earned Chiles the nickname “Walkin’ Lawton” and helped him win a seat in the U.S. Senate.

The next installment in our 50th anniversary series reviews Chiles’ walk as a campaign strategy and its impact on Florida politics.

“Back in 1970, Lawton was a little-known state senator from Lakeland and did not have a huge campaign war chest,” said Ron Sachs, CEO of Sachs Media Group in Tallahassee and former communications director for Lawton Chiles when he was governor.

Fifty-years ago this month, former Gov. Lawton Chiles wrapped up his 1,000-mile walk across Florida. At the time, he was a candidate for a U.S. Senate seat.

As part of our 50th anniversary series, we’re taking some time to review “Walkin’ Lawton’s” political legacy, as one of the last Democratic political leaders in a state now controlled by Republicans.

On Thursday, the Florida Forest Service, a division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, reported 56 wildfires burning over 7,000 acres statewide, including about 3,000 acres in Northwest Florida.