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Mary Shedden

News Director

Mary Shedden is news director at WUSF Public Media, where she oversees a team of reporters covering 13 counties on Florida’s west coast.

A journalist for more than two decades, Mary arrived at WUSF in 2013, where she worked first as a reporter and then as editor of the Health News Florida journalism collaborative. She became news director in 2015.

Mary’s journalism has been recognized numerous times, including a 2016 national Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio and Television Digital News Association for Health News Florida. Her work also has been honored by the Florida Associated Press Broadcasters, and state and regional chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Before joining WUSF, Shedden spent nearly 20 years at The Tampa Tribune and TBO.com, Florida Today and the Gainesville Sun, where she covered everything from the investigation of a serial killer to retired pro athletes in chronic pain.

Contact Mary at 813-974-8636, on twitter @MaryShedden or by email at shedden@wusf.org.

 

Ways to Connect

Albumarium

The internet is an enormous blessing and curse for the media. It’s provided an immediate, worldwide outlet for news organizations to share their stories.

But, it’s also an unstable business environment where companies are struggling to make money from an audience that wants and expects to get the news for free.

WUSF News is looking for student journalists ready for the opportunity to work in a professional newsroom. We're taking applications for the Spring 2018 Stephen Noble Internship - a semester-long chance to develop into a public radio reporter.

You'll work closely with our team of seasoned reporters learning how to research, write and produce stories for radio and online platforms. It’s place where students are treated like a real journalist from the start, assigned stories that matter to millions of Tampa Bay area residents.

Wikimedia Commons

The New York Times recently exposed movie mogul Harvey Weinstein for his sexual harassment of women for decades. This week, the country’s paper of record announced a new editor, dedicated to leading coverage of gender issues. More specifically: women.

It comes at a time when there’s been a flurry of news stories about powerful men and powerful companies harassing women, discriminating against them and otherwise making work life miserable.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

Humanitarian flights to the islands of St. Croix and Puerto Rico are continuing in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

Crews based at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa on Friday loaded a cargo plane with supplies and headed for St. Croix, where patients from island hospitals were picked up and taken to a Columbia, South Carolina hospital

Florida Office Of The Governor

O.J. Simpson is set to be released from a Nevada prison next week. And Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is trying to stop the celebrity-turned convicted robber from moving here.

Twitter founder and CEO Jack Dorsey blew up his social media platform this week by introducing the possibility that the company may double how much users can say in one tweet.

And if an ongoing beta test of the new 280-character limit works as the social media company hopes, all of the estimated 328 million people with Twitter accounts could be waxing poetic a lot more.

Highlands County Sheriff's Office

Nearly every part of Florida was affected by Hurricane Irma, including rural Highlands County, where more than 80 percent of the roughly 100,000 residents on Thursday remained without power and a curfew remains in effect.

WUSF Public Media

We’ve been asking you to share your experience with Hurricane Irma, and many Tampa Bay area residents answered our call.

This week on Florida Matters we hear from listeners who told us what it was like for them to make it through the storm, and how they’ve been holding up since Irma left the state.


U.S. Navy

Many Tampa Bay-area public school districts are not resuming classes until next week, as they assess damage from Hurricane Irma.

YouTube

It’s been nearly a week since Hurricane Harvey reached the Texas coast and news from the devastation continues to consume the news cycle and our social media feeds.

But one thing that’s clear is that the dramatic way the flooding is unfolding -- and how people around Houston are communicating with one another - is completely changing the way we’re seeing and hearing the stories of natural disasters.

The race for St. Petersburg mayor is technically non-partisan. But party politics may have been a factor in the razor-thin primary finish Tuesday night.

A Twitter profile called “Yes, You’re Racist” is asking the Internet to help identify people who participated in the marches in Charlottesville, Virginia and are believed to be white nationalists.

The result of this citizen brigade: some of the marchers are being named, threatened, and some are losing their jobs.

Summer is in full swing and for those who can't get out of town, a staycation can make all the difference. This week on Florida Matters we're taking a look at some ways to escape the everyday hustle and bustle and have some fun in the Tampa Bay Area. 


WUSF TV Ending Operations Oct. 15

Aug 11, 2017

After 51 years of providing educational television for the Tampa Bay area, WUSF TV will be going off the air Oct. 15th.

Mary Shedden / WUSF Public Media

Tourism brought in an estimated $109 billion a year to Florida at last count. This week on Florida Matters we’re taking a look at the current state of Florida’s number one industry.


Wikimedia Commons

Last week, a colorful rant by the short-lived White House Communications Director left media across the country and world scrambling to figure out what to do with some pretty vulgar words.

WUSF News won three first place awards, including Anchor of the Year honors for All Things Considered host Lisa Peakes, at the 23rd Annual Sunshine State Awards announced Saturday night in Miami.

Wikimedia Commons

Over the past two years, there’s been a small wave of press freedom laws passing across the country. And they’re all focused on student press freedom.

people at the beach
Lisa Peakes/WUSF Public Media

It's the middle of the summer and frankly, some of us are bored.

Families with school-aged children are among the most stir crazy, but Sharon Kennedy Wynne of the Tampa Bay Times said there are a lot of free or affordable local getaways to survive in the days before school starts.

City of Orlando

It’s been a year since 49 people died in a mass shooting at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando.

It happened in a city best known as a wholesome family vacation destination, but one that has also unofficially been host for the past 25 years to Disney’s Gay Days. That event attracts about 150,000 people a year to local attractions, hotels, restaurants and clubs.

These days, the barrage of news coming from Washington DC includes a lot that's being leaked to the media via anonymous sources. President Donald Trump and a number of lawmakers are saying the leaks are not just dangerous - they're illegal.

And now, there's been an arrest.

CNN.com

News of a suicide bomber outside a pop concert in Manchester, England earlier this week horrified us.

As expected, cable news shows and online publications responded right away – piecing some of the breaking news story together using a slew of social media.

One result was an endless loop of cell phone videos on our computers and TVs from victims at the event.

Wikipedia Commons

It’s been a crazy week for journalists.

The FBI director was fired and he learned about it from the media.

Wikimedia Commons

Former St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Baker has filed to enter the race for his old job against incumbent Mayor Rick Kriseman.

Baker, who served as the city's mayor from 2001 to 2010, filed paperwork with the city clerk’s office Monday morning for a race that officially is non-partisan.

WikiTribune.com

Two of the world’s best-known technology companies are asking their online audience to boost the credibility of information on the internet.

Pulitzers.org

This week, the annual Pulitzer Prizes were announced.

And while critics like President Trump may call it a celebration of the “failing” media, the announcement really was what it’s always been: a recognition of remarkable journalism.

CaitlynJenner.com

The Associated Press made news right here in Tampa Bay recently, when leaders announced at the American Society of Copy Editors convention a change to a longtime piece of language.

CNN

There seems to be no shortage of opinionated voices in today’s media.

On cable TV, where pundits and politicians seem to spar around the clock, you could say it's overwhelming. But that’s not the case for American newspapers, where opinion pages are becoming endangered.

Cathy Carter / WUSF

MLB spring training is well underway, and there's a lot of talk about multimillion dollar renovations at Tampa Bay area stadiums. They're supported in part by local tax dollars.

The Detroit Tigers have unveiled a revamped facility in Lakeland. The New York Yankees have done the same in Tampa, and Dunedin is planning upgrades for the Toronto Blue Jays. Sarasota County is opting to start from ground zero, potentially investing in a new $75 million facility for the Atlanta Braves.

U.S. Sen. Rick Scott said Sunday that he was never told by Homeland Security officials in 2016 when he was Florida's governor that Russian hackers had gained access to voter databases in two Florida counties ahead of the presidential election.
MyFloridaHouse.gov

Governor Rick Scott kicked off Florida's 2017 legislative session with his annual State of the State Address. This week on Florida Matters we're re-broadcasting portions of the governor's speech, which aired live on WUSF 89.7.


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