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Marva Hinton

Marva Hinton is originally from North Carolina. She works as a reporter and fill-in anchor for WLRN. 

Before coming to WLRN, she spent several years working as a radio news reporter and anchor in Orlando. During her stint there she covered everything from shuttle launches to the foreclosure crisis and the Casey Anthony trial.

Prior to that, Marva worked in radio news in Raleigh, North Carolina and Radford, Virginia. She began her career as a radio news producer in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Marva has an MFA in creative writing from Antioch University Los Angeles. She also holds a BA in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she completed a double major in political science. 

In her spare time, she enjoys playing the pan flute and teaching her cats to do tricks.

Marva is married and lives in Miami.

For the past three years, public health activists have been trying to convince Florida lawmakers to support a needle-exchange program to fight the HIV epidemic in South Florida, and for the past three years they’ve been turned down.

One Miami activist refuses to wait for lawmakers. George Gibson is an ordained minister. Nearly everyone calls him Elder as in a church elder.

He says his needle-exchange program is related to his religious work.

“I see it as being an AIDS ministry,” he said.

Three years ago a blistering assessment by a national advocacy group prompted the Florida Department of Transportation to get serious about making the state’s roadways safer for pedestrians and cyclists. After four Florida metropolitan areas were ranked as the most dangerous for pedestrians, FDOT leaders began to consider making design changes such as building narrower lanes.

Proponents of narrower lanes argue that wide, open lanes encourage motorists to hit the gas and endanger pedestrians, while narrow lanes force motorists to slow down.

Do you have sloppy penmanship? A Florida International University professor's research finds that kids whose writing is easy to read tend to do better in school.

 

After examining the handwriting of 3,000 preschool students in Miami-Dade County, an FIU study found good handwriting and good grades are related.

FIU early childhood education professor Laura Dinehart focused her study on students from low-income households.