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Kerry Sheridan

Reporter/Host

Kerry Sheridan is a reporter and co-host of All Things Considered at WUSF Public Media.

Prior to joining WUSF, she covered international news, health, science, space and environmental issues for Agence France-Presse from 2005 to 2019, reporting from the Middle East bureau in Cyprus, followed by stints in Washington and Miami.

Kerry earned her master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 2002, and was a recipient of the Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship for Cultural Reporting.

She got her start in radio news as a freelancer with WFUV in the Bronx in 2002. Since then, her stories have spanned a range of topics, including politics, baseball, rocket launches, art exhibits, coral reef restoration, life-saving medical research, and more.

She is a native of upstate New York, and currently lives with her husband and two children in Sarasota.

You can reach Kerry via email at sheridank@wusf.org, on Twitter @kerrsheridan or by phone at 813-974-8663.

Sarasota Schools Superintendent Todd Bowden has agreed to step down from his post.

On the eve of the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, students and faculty at New College of Florida swung their sledgehammers Friday and knocked down a replica of the infamous wall, which they'd built on campus in September as a way to study the history of the era and how societal divisions persist today.

Plans to expand Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in Sarasota were rejected Tuesday night by a 3-2 city commission vote, but the leadership of the privately owned garden is vowing to find another way to pursue what it describes as much-needed growth.

Tensions ran high at a special school board meeting on Tuesday in Sarasota, where school superintendent Todd Bowden faced mounting pressure to resign over allegations he acted too slowly when he learned that a subordinate was accused of sexually harassing a co-worker.

The Berlin Wall fell 30 years ago, ending an era of Cold War division between East and West, democracy and communism. At a time when U.S. culture is increasingly divided along partisan lines, students and professors at New College of Florida decided to build a Berlin Wall again, as a way of studying the history of divisions and how they persist today.

Computer simulations have long helped train doctors in complex medical procedures. Now, tens of thousands of Florida teachers and school staff are using online simulators to learn how to talk to troubled students.

With a curved carapace, angry-looking eyes and a spiky tail, horseshoe crabs look like nature’s armored tanks, crawling in the sand at the shore.

Climate change is a major problem, and solving it will be complicated.

But people can make a difference in their daily lives, a local environmental expert said Tuesday during a free class aimed at empowering individuals to make meaningful changes.

The potential impeachment of a President, like Donald Trump, is a highly partisan affair, where truth can be hard to find.

Political science professor Frank Orlando of St. Leo University is teaching his students to understand it through the lens of both history, and strategy.

man and woman hold hands, drinking
Pexel

Drinking is one of the top reasons for divorce in married couples.

And while alcohol can be a problem for couples of all ages, a psychology researcher at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg says there are ways to work through it.

Author Gilbert King talks to WUSF's Kerry Sheridan
Daylina Miller/WUSF Public Media

Author Gilbert King won a Pulitzer Prize for his 2013 book, "Devil In The Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys and the Dawn of a New America." His latest book, "Beneath A Ruthless Sun," also focuses on a true story of racial injustice in Florida in the 1950s.

The New York-based author is in St. Petersburg to talk about how writers can help awaken social justice. WUSF's Kerry Sheridan spoke with him about why these stories are important to tell.


Dr. Carol Probstfeld speaks at a podium
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF

Americans owe $1.5 trillion dollars in student debt. Some Democratic presidential candidates argue that free tuition is the answer. 

Early Voting Here sign
WUSF

Early voting on college campuses was allowed in Florida for the first time in 2018. A new study suggests the convenience helped increase the number of young voters.

Psychologist Eddy Regnier
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF Public Media

Schools across the state are back in session, many with increased security measures and monthly active shooter drills, in an effort to ramp up security in the wake of last year’s deadly massacre at Marjory Stoneman Dougas High School in Parkland. 

Sea turtle nesting season runs from May until the end of October.
Lisa Peakes/WUSF

The number of sea turtle nests on Sarasota County beaches has hit a 38-year high.

Children do math during the summer at Alta Vista Elementary in Sarasota
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF

In mid-July, eight third-graders sit cross-legged on the floor as they work intently on a math problem, using small eraser boards in their laps. Many are wearing their school uniforms, even though it's summer break. 

school supplies
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF

It's back-to-school shopping time for many families, and the annual sales tax holiday in Florida is different from years past. It runs Friday, August 2 to Tuesday, August 6, and includes computer and tablets up to $1,000 for the first time.

Assistant professor at USFSP Heather Judkins
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF

Sailing on a research cruise in the Gulf of Mexico last month to study deep sea creatures that make their own light – like jellyfish, anglerfish and shrimp – a team of scientists worked long hours and grabbed naps when they could.

One day, around noon, University of South Florida St. Petersburg marine biologist Heather Judkins was about to doze off for a couple of hours when she heard a knock on the door.

“I love pods of dolphins. But I was like, I hope they are not waking me up for a pod of dolphins,” Judkins recalled.

Children play soccer in stock photo
Petaluma Youth Soccer League

Children's recreational sports are growing more competitive than ever, and with that can come big injuries. 

A first-of-its-kind study on children ages 5 to 11 who play recreational sports has found that concussions are the most common injury in this age group.

Inner city housing projects are sometimes blamed for perpetuating the cycle of poverty and crime. One African-American architect is using hip-hop music to teach children of color how to plan, design and build their own future homes and cities.

Man in jail garb faces another man
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF

Going to jail can mean losing everything, including your identification card. Traffic tickets and fines can pile up, and bureaucracy can be tough to navigate. And sometimes, people can’t get jobs, or housing, and end up back in jail.

The Sarasota County Jail has a new program that helps inmates get proper identification before they are released. The hope is that these basic steps will cut down on repeat jail terms.

Four students stand together in graduation caps and gowns
Pinellas County Schools

Wearing a black cap and gown, with a golden stole around her shoulders, Shadine Henry walked to the microphone at the Tropicana Field stage on May 25, 2019, and talked of battle.

Senator Rick Scott stands at podium
Kerry Sheridan/WUSF

Hurricane season starts June 1, and now is the time to get prepared, officials said this week.

Construction equipment in a yard
Kerry Sheridan/WUSF

Nearly two-thirds of Florida –some 6.7 million customers - lost power during 2017’s Hurricane Irma. Utilities blamed most of those outages on falling trees and debris that knocked over power lines.

To strengthen the electrical grid against future storms, Florida Power and Light is moving more power lines underground.

Governor Ron DeSantis speaks at podium on high school lawn
Kerry Sheridan/WUSF

Beginning in July, Florida police can pull over drivers they suspect of texting while driving. That’s according to a bill signed by Gov. Ron DeSantis Friday.

Six schools in Hillsborough County are removing mascots that depict Native Americans as Braves, Indians, Warriors or Chiefs, and will replace them with something new.

Sarasota County School Board Member Bridget Ziegler at a meeting Tuesday night
Kerry Sheridan/WUSF

The Sarasota County School Board has approved a deal for some University of South Florida college courses to be offered at local high schools.

A woman crouches on a beach searching for plastic pellets called nurdles
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF

Plastic pollution is a growing problem in the world's oceans. A new citizen science initiative, called the Nurdle Patrol, is tracking a danger to marine life that is washing ashore by the millions across the Gulf of Mexico.

They're called nurdles. And what's that exactly?

Man stands in front of school
Hillsborough County Schools

Hillsborough County was part of a recent nationwide effort to improve schools from the top down, through a project known as the "principal pipeline."

The red and orange sun sets over dark water
Kerry Sheridan / WUSF Public Media

Sad songs. Why do we love them so much? And might they be bad for us? Especially for people with clinical depression?

Psychology researchers at the University of South Florida studied this question, and uncovered some surprising results.

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