LISTEN LIVE

Dinorah Prevost

Producer, Florida Matters

Dinorah Prevost is the producer of Florida Matters, WUSF's weekly public affairs show.

She returns to WUSF after spending summer 2018 as a radio news intern. She had so much fun editing her feature stories for University Beat that a year later, she became dead set on becoming an audio producer. Before WUSF, she worked as a web producer at the Tampa Bay Times and a freelance reporter for Creative Loafing Tampa Bay. 

In her spare time, she enjoys reading memoirs, going to concerts and hanging out at local parks. 

screengrab of  Facebook Live video
WUSF Public Media / WMFE / Facebook

Florida’s rapid rise in the number of coronavirus cases is derailing plans for some businesses to reopen.

Coronavirus Test Kit
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

With more than 100,000 cases of COVID-19 in Florida now, public health experts are saying a second spike in infections is underway.

Donna Petersen is dean of the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida. She says it's impossible to completely eliminate the illness, but wearing face coverings and keeping six feet apart from others really does help slow the spread.

Preschool children at a table.
Kerry Sheridan/WUSF / WUSF Public Media

With the start of school just two months away, Governor Ron DeSantis is suggesting public schools return to campus for the fall semester.

Daylina Miller/WUSF Public Media

Angela Herrera and Akristionna King are young activists who have organized the protests in Orlando over the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.

Through their efforts, they are trying to send a message to those gathering to protest Floyd’s death.

Let your voices be heard, but do so peacefully.

Host Matthew Peddie (on right half of the screenshot) speaks with Gabrielle Russon of the Orlando Sentinel (on left half of the screenshot).
The State We're In/Facebook / WMFE and WUSF Public Media

Legoland officially reopened Monday and it offered some clues about what theme park fans might expect in the post-pandemic world.

Reporter Gabrielle Russon of the Orlando Sentinel visited the Winter Haven park and says it's a lot like other businesses that are trying to minimize the spread of coronavirus.

Host Matthew Peddie (on left half of the screen) speaks with Robert Niles of ThemeParkInsider.com (on right half of the screen).
The State We're In/Facebook / WMFE and WUSF Public Media

When the first of Florida’s theme parks reopen next week, Robert Niles predicts they will be taking a cautious approach towards welcoming visitors back.

“On the attractions themselves, that’s a managed environment. Once they enter the queue for an attraction, it’s relatively simple as a concept to keep people spaced apart,” Niles said. “It’s out there on the streets of the theme park where the challenge [arises].”

FPREN meteorologist Ray Hawthorne (on the left half of the screen) speaks with host Bradley George (on the right half of the screen) about the possible shape of this year's hurricane season.
The State We're In/Facebook / WMFE and WUSF Public Media

Changes Floridians have made as a result of coronavirus could turn out helping them during hurricane season.

Ray Hawthorne is a meteorologist with the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network. Hawthorne was a guest earlier today on The State We're In - a Facebook Live show from WUSF and WMFE in Orlando. 

Host Bradley George (on the right hand of the screen) speaks with Bob Devin Jones of Studio@620 (on the left half of the screen).
The State We're In/Facebook / WMFE and WUSF Public Media

In-person art performances have been off-limits for most people since coronavirus changed our daily routines.

But that's not stopping actors and artists from their craft, says Bob Devin Jones, co-founder and artistic director of Studio@620, a small performing arts venue in St. Petersburg.

Host Matthew Peddie (on right) talks with Kimberly Renk, a UCF professor who specializes in child psychology (on left).
The State We're In/Facebook / WMFE and WUSF Public Media

Children of all ages are having a hard time processing how coronavirus has changed their lives.

Psychologist Kimberly Renk said parents can help kids organize those feelings. But the University of Central Florida professor said parents first need to assess how they're being affected by the pandemic.

Sandra and Chris Miller (left half of screenshot) spoke with host Bradley George (right half of screenshot).
The State We're In/ Facebook / WMFE and WUSF Public Media

It's been almost a month since Florida's schools went entirely online.

Sandra Miller and her husband Chris teach high school in Pinellas County. She keeps adapting English assignments and grading to reflect online learning.

On a split screen, a man on the left, talks to a woman on the right
The State We're In/Facebook / WUSF Public Media

Political leaders making decisions about coronavirus are often straddling the issues of health and money.

Local public health expert Donna Petersen said that's because the loss of jobs and a lack of money can affect human health too.

Petersen is dean of the University of South Florida’s College of Public Health. Petersen spoke with WUSF’s Bradley George about coronavirus and its impact on communities on The State We’re In, a weekly Facebook Live show from WUSF and its partner WMFE in Orlando.

The image shows David Brancaccio on the left and host Bradley George on the right talking on stage during a live interview at the Palladium in downtown St. Peterburg.
WUSF Public Media

Just days before officials began shutting down large gatherings to slow the spread of COVID 19, David Brancaccio, host of the Marketplace Morning Report, visited downtown St. Petersburg for a live event.

He joined Florida Matters Host Bradley George at the Palladium as part of the Aresty Speaker Series, and touched on a wide variety of topics from the effect coronavirus was having on the global economy, as well as Brancaccio's ongoing Econ Extra Credit project, in which he is reading a chapter a week from an open source economics textbook.

Alsace Walentine, owner of Tombolo Books, stands outside of her store next to a sign that says "Curbside pickup here!"
Mary Shedden / WUSF Public Media

The coronavirus pandemic is not only taking its toll of the nation’s healthcare system, but also its businesses. This week, Florida Matters takes a look at small businesses, which are particularly hard hit.

Host Bradley George spoke with Alsace Walentine, co-owner of Tombolo Books in St. Petersburg and Eileen Rodriguez of the Florida Small Business Development Center at the University of South Florida.

Health workers in protective gear collect swabs from patients who drove up to the testing site.
Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

After opening up drive thru testing for COVID-19 Wednesday at locations across the Bay Area, BayCare is narrowing requirements for testing starting Saturday.

The image shows plastic mail trays with a green "Ballots Only" tag hanging from the side.
Thomas Iacobucci / WUSF Public Media

Floridians are heading to the polls on Tuesday where voters will decide which Democratic candidate they want to face president Donald Trump in November. 

WUSF is bringing you live coverage of Florida's primaries throughout the night and we're inviting you to join the conversation.

Floridians are going to the polls on March 17 for the state’s presidential primary. This election cycle, WUSF is focusing on the issues rather than the political horse race.

To do that, WUSF has teamed up with reporters at NPR member station WMFE in Orlando for I-4 Votes, a collaboration covering the election issues that matter to those living along the I-4 corridor.

Dinorah Prevost / WUSF Public Media

Chris Price stands in the backroom of Dissent Brewing in St. Petersburg. He’s among steel tanks full of beer lining the walls.

But instead of drinking beer, he’s dissecting it, trying to reduce the carbonation – the foamy bubbles you get when you pour one. To do that, he transfers a sample back and forth between a pitcher and a measuring cup over a sink.

Mote Marine Laboratory

Sea turtle deaths continue to increase as red tide lingers off Florida's southwestern coast. While the numbers remain steady in Charlotte, Lee and Collier counties, Sarasota is experiencing a spike in cases. 

Courtesy of the City of St. Petersburg

A new home has been proposed for the Echelman sculpture in the St. Petersburg Pier District. Last Friday, city officials and opposition to the original Spa Beach location met to discuss potential new sites.

Quincy Walters/WUSF

Tampa City Council members decided today to allow Ybor City’s wild chickens to continue roaming the neighborhood.

This comes after last month's meeting where some residents complained about the chickens while others spoke in favor of them. 

Mark Schreiner / WUSF Public Media

Twenty-five years after his death, famed African-American tennis player Arthur Ashe has yet to have his biography written.

This August, that changes when USF St. Petersburg professor Ray Arsenault's newest book, “Arthur Ashe: A Life,” is published by Simon & Schuster. The 700-plus-page book will be the first extensive biography of Ashe.

Dinorah Prevost / WUSF Public Media

As sea levels continue to rise in Florida, repeated flooding and storm surge are major concerns for Tampa Bay.

David Hastings, a climate scientist at Eckerd College, said the region could experience some of the most severe effects of climate change. He told the civic group Cafe Con Tampa on Friday that in the next 30 years, sixty-five thousand homes in Florida will flood twice a month affecting 100,000 Florida residents.

Dinorah Prevost

Brice Hayes searches the hallways and classrooms at Charles S. Rushe Middle School for an active shooter.

A Pasco County deputy tells him how to point his gun and scan the rooms. Suddenly he finds the shooter in a classroom and opens fire.

Hayes was one of the trainees at an active shooter training for new school safety guards held Friday by the Pasco Sheriff’s Office.

Hillsborough commissioners will allow voters to decide if they want non-partisan elections in the races of five county officials.

Commissioners voted Wednesday to hold a referendum in November. The proposal would affect races for county sheriff, clerk of the court, property appraiser, tax collector and supervisor of elections.

The vote was 5-2 along party lines with Republican commissioners in favor of nonpartisan elections.

Over 4,000 Pasco County voters will be receiving potentially misleading voter registration forms.

It's a warning that comes from the county Supervisor of Elections, Brian Corley.

Saint Leo University Polling Institute

Saint Leo University Polling Institute recently asked Americans how patriotic they are. One thing that a majority of them agreed on when it came to patriotism is over how the National Football League plans to handle players who kneel on the field during the national anthem.

Courtesy of Jacob Campoamor

In a rare sighting last weekend, boaters spotted multiple whale sharks off the coast of Anna Maria Island.

That has grabbed the attention of scientists at the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in Sarasota, who are now asking the public to report other sightings.

Julio Ochoa / WUSF Public Media

Republican gubernatorial candidate Adam Putnam announced his campaign plans for public safety with a focus on fighting crime and combatting the opioid epidemic.

Visit Florida

A property owner in St. Pete Beach has won big in a dispute over public beach access.

A federal court has ordered the city to pay Chet Chmielewski's estate $1.5 million.

Wikimedia Commons

Changes are coming to Tampa Electric's coal-fired Big Bend Power Station in Apollo Beach. 

As part of their “Big Bend project," TECO will spend $853 million to convert one of its coal units, Unit 1, to use natural gas. Another coal unit, Unit 2, will be shut down in 2021. 

Cherie Jacobs, a spokeswoman for TECO, said this move is part of the companies move away from coal by 2023.

"This Tampa Electric project is part of our strategy to reduce our carbon footprint," said Jacobs.

Pages