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Andrea Seabrook 2007

Andrea Seabrook

Andrea Seabrook covers Capitol Hill as NPR's Congressional Correspondent.

In each report, Seabrook explains the daily complexities of legislation and the longer trends in American politics. She delivers critical, insightful reporting – from the last Republican Majority, through the speakership of Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats' control of the House, to the GOP landslide of 2010. She and NPR's Peter Overby won the prestigious Joan S. Barone award for their Dollar Politics series, which exposed the intense lobbying effort around President Obama's Health Care legislation. Seabrook and Overby's most recent collaboration, this time on the flow of money during the 2010 midterm elections, was widely lauded and drew a huge audience spike on NPR.org.

An authority on the comings and goings of daily life on Capitol Hill, Seabrook has covered Congress for NPR since January 2003 She took a year-and-a-half break, in 2006 and 2007, to host the weekend edition of NPR's newsmagazine, All Things Considered. In that role, Seabrook covered a wide range of topics, from the uptick in violence in the Iraq war, to the history of video game music.

A frequent guest host of NPR programs, including Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation, Seabrook has also anchored NPR's live coverage of national party conventions and election night in 2006 and 2008.

Seabrook joined NPR in 1998 as an editorial assistant for the music program, Anthem. After serving in a variety of editorial and production positions, she moved to NPR's Mexico Bureau to work as a producer and translator, providing fill-in coverage of Mexico and Central America. She returned to NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. in the fall of 1999 and worked on NPR's Science Desk and the NPR/National Geographic series, "Radio Expeditions." Later she moved to NPR's Morning Edition, starting as an editorial assistant and then moving up to Assistant Editor. She then began her on-air career as a weekend general assignment reporter for all NPR programs.

Before coming to NPR, Seabrook lived, studied and worked in Mexico City, Mexico. She ran audio for movies and television, and even had a bit part in a Mexican soap opera.

Seabrook earned her bachelor's degree in biology from Earlham College and studied Latin American literature at UNAM - La Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. While in college she worked at WECI, the student-run public radio station at Earlham College.

  • The true-crime podcast Serial tells the story of a suburban Baltimore murder. In a hearing Wednesday, the man convicted of murdering his ex-girlfriend is getting a chance to present new evidence.
  • Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan brings the kind of enthusiasm Mitt Romney could use — he's a darling of the conservative base that Romney has had a harder time winning over. But the ideas that have made him a star — particularly his plans for Medicare — may give Democrats an opening against him.
  • While superPACs are turning out to be some of the biggest moneymakers this election season, President Obama, so far, has stayed old school. He is raising funds for his traditional campaign committee, Obama for America, and a party fund that he can use.
  • On his popular program on the National Geographic Channel, Cesar Millan, known to frustrated pet owners as "The Dog Whisperer," encourages people to stop treating their dogs like babies and to reclaim their position as the pack leader in the house. Not surprisingly, he titled his new book Be the Pack Leader.
  • Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas' autobiography hits bookstores Oct. 1, coinciding with the court's new term. He received a $1.5 million advance for the memoir. He offers vivid, and at times, seething details about events surrounding his nomination.
  • Secretary of State Colin Powell tells a Senate committee a new statement from Osama bin Laden suggests links between Iraq and al Qaeda. The Arab network Al Jazeera today is airing a statement it says is from bin Laden. NPR's Andrea Seabrook reports.
  • Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) announces he has prostate cancer. The presidential candidate says surgery is planned for Wednesday. NPR's Andrea Seabrook reports.
  • NPR's Andrea Seabrook reports Secretary of State Colin Powell goes before a key Senate committee today, as members of Congress take stock of the evidence he presented to the United Nations yesterday. Some Democrats say if the United States attacks Iraq, it must maintain a peace-keeping force there for years to come.
  • A day after presenting the U.N. Security Council with a report against Iraq, Secretary of State Colin Powell prepares to deliver his annual foreign policy review before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. NPR's Andrea Seabrook reports.
  • President Bush today releases his budget for fiscal 2004. The proposal includes slashing taxes, reducing funding for many domestic programs, and increasing defense spending by $17 billion. NPR's Andrea Seabrook reports.