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Environment
The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition team has trekked through scrub, swamp and forest from one end of the state to the other. They have documented their journeys in film, books and photography exhibitions with a goal demonstrating the urgent need for an unbroken spine of wilderness running the length of Florida to give wildlife a chance for survival.The third expedition kicked off April 15 and once again, WUSF News reporters are along for the adventure. This time around the explorers want to highlight an area of wilderness in Central Florida that is threatened on all sides by urban development and transportation infrastructure including Interstate 4.WUSF Public Media is a sponsor of the Florida Wildlife Corridor. Follow along on with our reporters on our website and social media accounts on Facebook and on Twitter, using the hashtag #Heartland2Headwaters.

Wildlife Corridor Expedition Crosses Florida's Wildlife Barrier - I-4

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The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition started their trek in January at the tip of the Everglades, and they plan to end it next month at the Okeefenokee Swamp in Georgia.

The group is swinging east of Orlando's sprawl and are paddling up the St. John's River. On Sunday, they crossed one the state's great dividing lines for wildlife - Interstate 4. They traversed I-4 at the site of a planned underpass, which is crucial to achieving their goal of a continuous wildlife corridor. And now, as WUSF's Carson Cooper reports, they're about to be the first to walk across all the conservation areas in Volusia County.