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Environment
The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition team has trekked through scrub, swamp and forest from one end of the state to the other. They have documented their journeys in film, books and photography exhibitions with a goal demonstrating the urgent need for an unbroken spine of wilderness running the length of Florida to give wildlife a chance for survival.The third expedition kicked off April 15 and once again, WUSF News reporters are along for the adventure. This time around the explorers want to highlight an area of wilderness in Central Florida that is threatened on all sides by urban development and transportation infrastructure including Interstate 4.WUSF Public Media is a sponsor of the Florida Wildlife Corridor. Follow along on with our reporters on our website and social media accounts on Facebook and on Twitter, using the hashtag #Heartland2Headwaters.

Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition Gets Surprise Gift from President Obama

KISSIMMEE - The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition neared civilization today. The group stopped at a wilderness preserve on the edge of Orlando’s sprawl, where they received an unexpected gift - from President Obama.

The gift was a copy of both the expedition’s route map through Florida and a photograph by group member Carlton Ward Jr. – both signed by the president. The items were brought to the White House by members of the Northern Everglades Alliance, which is trying to protect the headwaters of the Kissimmee River.

Ward had just rode into the Disney Wilderness Preserve near Kissimmee on horseback – 17 miles.

"To be here with a group of ranchers from the Northern Everglades Alliance is special, because this group of people have been stewards of their land for generations," he said. "To come in on horseback was a fitting opportunity that we’re very thankful for."

The expedition members are now poised to paddle north on the St. John’s River on their way to north Florida and the Georgia state line. They’re walking 1,000 miles in 100 days to publicize the need to connect the state’s wild areas into a continuous corridor.