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The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition team has trekked through scrub, swamp and forest from one end of the state to the other. They have documented their journeys in film, books and photography exhibitions with a goal demonstrating the urgent need for an unbroken spine of wilderness running the length of Florida to give wildlife a chance for survival.The third expedition kicked off April 15 and once again, WUSF News reporters are along for the adventure. This time around the explorers want to highlight an area of wilderness in Central Florida that is threatened on all sides by urban development and transportation infrastructure including Interstate 4.WUSF Public Media is a sponsor of the Florida Wildlife Corridor. Follow along on with our reporters on our website and social media accounts on Facebook and on Twitter, using the hashtag #Heartland2Headwaters.

Keys to Freeze Pedaling 9,000 Miles from Key West to Deadhorse, Alaska

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Credit Steve Newborn / WUSF News
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WUSF News
Keys to Freeze meets members of the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition at Blackwater River State Park

A group of six 20-somethings - including three from the Tampa Bay area - decided they needed a little exercise while getting a tour of America. So they decided to hop on their bicycles and pedal across the country.

No, this isn't the typical coast-to-coast trip. They started in January in Key West - and are biking to Deadhorse, Alaska.

Nine thousand miles.

The call themselves "Keys to Freeze."

They're now somewhere around Albuquerque, New Mexico. WUSF's Steve Newborn caught up with them recently after they had pedaled a mere one thousand miles to Pensacola. He talks with Rachel Burns of St. Petersburg, Brady Lawrence of Raleigh, North Carolina, and Reese Wells of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

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