© 2023 All Rights reserved WUSF
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

What you didn't learn about Martin Luther King Jr. in school

Civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968) addresses a rally at a church in Birmingham, Alabama, Oct. 14, 1963. (Frank Rockstroh/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
Civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968) addresses a rally at a church in Birmingham, Alabama, Oct. 14, 1963. (Frank Rockstroh/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Most Americans are familiar with the hopeful vision of unity presented in Martin Luther King Jr.’s iconic “I have a dream” speech. But scholars say King’s message has been misinterpreted over the years by politicians and members of the public, obscuring his anti-racist philosophies and calls to action.

Peniel Joseph, a professor of history and public affairs at the University of Texas Austin, joins Here & Now‘s Deepa Fernandes. Joseph is also the author of “The Third Reconstruction: America’s Struggle for Racial Justice in the Twenty-first Century.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Tags
WUSF 89.7 depends on donors for the funding it takes to provide you the most trusted source of news and information here in town, across our state, and around the world. Support WUSF now by giving monthly, or make a one-time donation online.