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National Report Says Agencies Behind Everglades Restoration Need To Account For Climate Change

Wayne Rassner, board chair of the South Florida National Parks Trust, shows off an alligator hole in a cypress dome at the heart of Everglades National Park.
Kate Stein
/
WLRN
Wayne Rassner, board chair of the South Florida National Parks Trust, shows off an alligator hole in a cypress dome at the heart of Everglades National Park.

Everglades restoration needs to do more to account for climate change.

That’s the headline of a report released Wednesday by a Congressionally-appointed committee of scientists.

The report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine says agencies involved in restoration need to do more analysis of how sea-level rise and increasing rainfall impact Everglades projects.

"With seven large projects to be constructed and three more nearing the end of their planning process, this is the opportune time for a mid-course assessment," Bill Boggess, the committee chair, said in a release.

Read more: What We Talk About When We Talk About Everglades Restoration

The report also calls for better monitoring to help ensure projects are being appropriately adapted to the changing climate.

The scientists anticipate about two-and-a-half feet of sea-level rise in the next 80 years, but say it could be significantly more than that.

This story has been corrected; the original version misstated the name of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

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Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read.
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