© 2022 All Rights reserved WUSF
News, Jazz, NPR
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Corruption Clouds Nigeria's Growing Gas Business

Ibrahim Magu is a Nigerian investigator looking into allegations of corruption that surround the construction of a LNG plant in the country. His office is drowning in paperwork related to his work. He let NPR's Steve Inskeep read key documents there.
Jim Wallace, NPR
/
Ibrahim Magu is a Nigerian investigator looking into allegations of corruption that surround the construction of a LNG plant in the country. His office is drowning in paperwork related to his work. He let NPR's Steve Inskeep read key documents there.

Nigeria's next big product may be something it has been burning off for years: natural gas.

Until recently, natural gas was treated as waste product of the oil recovery process. Now it's a product to be packaged and sold overseas.

Exporting natural gas requires an infrastructure for chilling it to the point where it turns liquid, and then shipping it out of the country.

In the rush to build this infrastructure, Nigeria's well-earned reputation for corruption may have touched some American companies.

A bribery scandal is brewing over the contruction of a $4 billion liquified natural gas (LNG) plant on Nigeria's coast.

Contracts to build the plant went to a group of international companies, inlcuding a subsidiary of Halliburton. Investigators in Nigeria and the United States are looking into allegations that bribes were paid to win the contracts.

The alleged payoffs come in a country that Transparency International ranks as one of the most corrupt in the world.

The rising demand worldwide for oil and gas could transform the finances of many African nations.

Americans worried about energy security might ask if the money will ease the problems of Africa's people, or leave the continent wondering how it all went up in smoke.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Steve Inskeep is a host of NPR's Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First.
WUSF 89.7 depends on donors for the funding it takes to provide you the most trusted source of news and information here in town, across our state, and around the world. Support WUSF now by giving monthly, or make a one-time donation online.