USF

FDOT

Do we hear voices raised in songs of thanksgiving? Early this morning, the Florida Department of Transportation reopened the railroad tracks at Fowler Avenue in North Tampa, just east of Nebraska Avenue. 

Kris Carson of the Florida Department of Transportation Tampa office says the annual average daily traffic count is around 48,500, so Fowler is a heavily traveled road.  

Happy Trails!

Steve Newborn / WUSF News

As the race for governor heats up, the Democrats are calling on some big names to help out Charlie Crist. Vice President Joe Biden is in South Florida this afternoon, and his wife Jill appeared today at the University of South Florida in Tampa. She listened to a group of students talking about making college affordable.

Biden says the average college student is weighed down with about $30,000 of debt when they graduate.

USF Unstoppable

In what they call a "visible thank you" to the school that helped them become successful, local businessman Les Muma and his wife, Pam, have donated $25 million to the University of South Florida College of Business - the largest single gift in USF's history.

FDOT

For the next week, your usual commute down Fowler Avenue, just east of Interstate 275 will be detoured.  

Take a look at this map. Florida Department of Transportation says drivers will not be able to pass through the intersection where the railroad crosses Fowler, east of Nebraska Avenue.

The work on the tracks begins October 16th at 9 p.m. The construction continues until complete "weather permitting."  

Earl Lennard Named USF 'Distinguished Alumni'

Oct 9, 2014

Many people know Earl Lennard as Hillsborough County's Supervisor of Elections, a job he retired from in 2012.

But before that, he spent more than four decades with Hillsborough County Public Schools as a teacher, and eventually as superintendent. Lennard is being presented with a Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of South Florida's College of Education on Friday.   

If the University of South Florida wants more state money to build a new medical school, they first need to decide where they want to build it.

That was the caveat laid down by the Florida Board of Governors' faculty committee at a meeting in Jupiter Wednesday.

Students Weigh In on Midterm Elections

Oct 7, 2014
Yoselis Ramos / WUSF Public Media

The University of South Florida conducted a straw poll on its Tampa campus to measure students' political opinions ahead of the November 4th midterm election.

92 percent of the 1,096 votes came from students and if the midterm elections were held now, 49 percent of the votes would go towards gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist. 

A majority of students preferred George Sheldon for Attorney General. 

newswatch.nationalgeographic.com

While University of South Florida consider the matter closed, an animal rights group is pushing both university police and federal officials to investigate the death of a rhesus monkey during a research study.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Sometimes the best partnerships are the ones made out of mutual need – take the new arrangement between USF Sarasota-Manatee and the Resort at Longboat Key Club.

WATCH: USF President Judy Genshaft joins Red Sofa Tour

Sep 23, 2014
Lucielle Salomon / WUSF News

The American Heart Association's Tampa Bay Red Sofa Tour stopped by the University of South Florida to encourage people to take a seat and talk about heart disease.

The campaign is an effort to bring awareness to cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Ashley Furniture Home Store is a sponsor of the campaign and they donated a custom-made red sofa, which will tour around the Tampa Bay area until Oct. 3.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Geology 3311, “The Solid Earth,” is a required course for University of South Florida students pursuing an undergraduate degree in geology.

This semester, it’s being taught by Assistant Research Professor, Zachary Atlas.

"This course is really geared towards trying to get them to know minerals, mineral formation, the chemistry of minerals and how all of that comes together to form rocks," Atlas said after a recent class.

It's also being taught by the Chair of the USF School of Geosciences, Dr. Jeffrey Ryan - when they can dial him up.

You see, Ryan is currently halfway across the globe on board a ship in the Pacific Ocean.

U.S. News and World Report

U.S. News and World Report has tallied up the data on nearly 1,800 colleges and universities around the country and issued its 2015 Best College Rankings. While there's little movement at the top, schools in the Sunshine State are seeing some changes.

Florida Inventors Hall of Fame

Innovation will be honored Wednesday night as the inaugural class is inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame at a private ceremony in Tampa.

Jane Goodall: Young People Can Make Difference

Sep 9, 2014
Yoselis Ramos

Jane Goodall, the scientist behind a landmark study of chimpanzee behavior, spoke Tuesday night at the USF Sun Dome about her environmental conservation efforts and primate research experiences. But before that, Dr. Goodall visited local children at the USF Botanical Gardens.

She spoke to Pizzo Elementary students about her love of animals since childhood and how her mother supported her interests.

Yoselis Ramos

Legendary scientist Jane Goodall is speaking tonight at the USF Sun Dome at 7 p.m.  She first stopped at the USF Botanical Gardens to speak to children about her experiences in nature and her enthusiasm for botany, sharing simple goals everyone can take to protect nature.

Watch the video of part of her address:

The University of South Florida has been awarded by far the largest grant in the state to hire "navigators" who help uninsured people sign up for health insurance coverage through the federal Marketplace, the Department of Health and Human Services announced Monday.

Only two other Florida organizations won  navigator grants: the Epilepsy Foundation of Florida, $871,275, and the Pinellas County Commission, $535,156. 

The HistoryMakers

Poet Maya Angelou, actress Ruby Dee and even President Barack Obama have something in common. They've all participated in The History Makers project--the country's largest African American collection of video interviews capturing the struggles and achievements of the black experience.Those 2,600 HistoryMakers videos have a new home--the Library of Congress.

It was 1985 when Henrietta Smith was the first African-American faculty member at the University of South Florida at the School of Library Science.  

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

When I asked Matt Knight, the Coordinator of the University of South Florida Library Special and Digital Collections, how many pieces are held in the archives of the USF Tampa Library – I mean, individual pieces: every book, every oral history, every single piece of minutiae in the dozens of separate, smaller compilations, I got this reply:

"Boy, I wish you didn’t ask me that question - I am not sure, I mean, it’s just…" he said, his voice tailing off with an exasperated sigh.

That’s because the total is most likely in the hundreds of thousands, if not the low seven figures.

So Knight and his fellow Special Collections Librarians Andy Huse and Melanie Griffin really had their work cut out for them when they had to pick just some of those items to put on display for the public at a recent event called “A Few of Our Favorite Things.”

Pool/Edmund D. Fountain / Tampa Bay Times

  It's taken University of South Florida researchers more than three years to provide one family with an answer they've been looking for, for more than 70 years.

The researchers uncovered remains from 55 unmarked graves on the grounds of the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna last year.  DNA testing has identified one set as belonging to George Owen Smith, who's believed to have died at age 14 -- shortly after being sent to the Florida Panhandle school in 1940.

USF Anthropologist Christian Wells says Smith was the first body found, but was in the worst shape.

John Moore / Getty Images/courtesy NPR

If things had gone as planned, USF Department of Anthropology Associate Professor Heide Castañeda would have spent the last two months in Texas and Mexico on a pair of research projects. She was going to talk to "mixed status" families on both sides of the border - families who have both legal and undocumented immigrants living in the United States - as well as meet with immigrants returning to Mexico.

Instead, she arrived just as the world's attention turned to the increasing number of Central American migrants fleeing their homes for what they thought was the promised land of the U.S.

Castañeda talked to University Beat on WUSF 89.7 about her visits to Sinaloa, Mexico, and McAllen, Texas, and what she saw there.

Here are some highlights from that interview:

Pages