USF

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

It may be an understatement, but biomedical research is a big business.

The National Institutes of Health has an annual budget of around $30 billion, and since it provides most of the federal funding for research at universities and laboratories, it supports over 400,000 jobs across the country.

GradImages

In addition to the graduates honored during the University of South Florida's Spring Commencement Ceremonies, Dr. Stuart Silverman was singled out after almost half a century of service.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

The recent Spring Commencement Ceremonies at the University of South Florida were certainly big on numbers, according to this week's University Beat.

Over 6,400 hundred degrees were awarded at seven ceremonies - Five exercises were held at USF's Tampa campus, and one each at USF St. Petersburg and USF Sarasota-Manatee. It's the most degrees ever conferred in a single commencement by the USF System.

The University of South Florida is being asked to repay $6.5 million in U.S. Department of Health and Human Services grant money it claimed, The Tampa Tribune reports.

Candace Kaw

Twelve teams of students from eight Florida universities recently faced off at the Second Annual State of Florida Healthcare Innovation Competition to determine whose medical technology reigned supreme -- and the winners walked away with $10,000.

"The competition brings together collegiate healthcare innovators from across the state, and allows them an opportunity to pitch their innovation ideas, concepts, and products before a panel of qualified judges," said Dr. Michael Fountain, director for event co-sponsor, the University of South Florida Center for Entrepreneurship. "In addition to winning cash prizes, these innovations gain insight from these world-class experts to help them move their technologies forward."

A wide variety of products and ideas was pitched, from a Google Glass application for people with cognitive and physical disabilities to a grocery store chain that sells healthy food in low-income neighborhoods.

"I think it speaks, very clearly, to the breadth of what can be done in healthcare innovation, whether it starts out with an application all the way to a small molecule," Fountain added.

GradImages

In addition to the "to selfie or not to selfie" debate, there are a number of other stories making news at this weekend's University of South Florida Spring Commencement - including a family of graduates, a former migrant worker turned educator, and a USF professor whose voice is recognizable to thousand of alumni.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Is there a better way to handle the stress of final exams than by petting a miniature stallion?

Okay, it's not Wellness USF's entire plan to help students manage the fear of the last days of class, but Scooby Boo, a tiny 12 year-old horse (wearing USF green sneakers), is one of the organization's secret weapons to provide a break from the pressure.

If you're a University of South Florida student graduating next month and your plan is to take a selfie photo on stage, the University has one word for you: don't!

In a story that's receiving national attention, the USF Division of Student Affairs sent out a notice to all graduating seniors and placed an ad in the school newspaper, The Oracle, requesting that they don't take pictures of themselves when they receive their diplomas from President Judy Genshaft.

Also on the list of what's labeled as 'inappropriate behaviors' are stepping, strolling and marching. Just a simple handshake, pose for the official photo with the President and move on, please.

Violators may face disciplinary action, including the withholding of their degree.

USF News

In an honor for both the students and the school, three University of South Florida juniors have been named Barry M. Goldwater Scholars.

Not only are Michael Calzadilla, Kaitlin Deutsch and Fiona Kearns among the 238 students from across the country receiving the honor, they're also the only Goldwater Scholars this year in the State University System of Florida.

Who Will Have the Bomb in 2020 in the Middle East?

Mar 17, 2014
Yoselis Ramos / WUSF

Over a two-day conference that started Monday at the University of South Florida, experts are looking into the future of the Middle East and Central Asia in the year 2020 and what implications that has on American foreign policy.

One of the big "what if" questions at this conference was "who will have the bomb in 2020?" In other words, what are the possibilities of a Middle Eastern country getting a nuclear weapon?

One of the most powerful questions that can be asked is "What if?"

What if America lowers its troop presence overseas? What if there's another Arab Spring? What if a new country or even terrorists get their hands on a weapon of mass destruction?

As Dr. Mohsen Milani explains, those kind of scenarios are the focus of a conference, The Greater Middle East and Central Asia in 2020 and Its Implications for American Foreign Policy, taking place at the University of South Florida next Monday and Tuesday.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

When it comes to the new Florida Center for Cybersecurity at USF, managing director Sri Sridharan isn’t afraid to aim high.

“If someone has a question a couple of years from now in Billings, Montana, and says, ‘I have a question on cybersecurity,’ the answer should be, ‘Hey, go to those guys at University of South Florida, they’ll have the answer for you,’” Sridharan said.

Beginning this fall, the center will offer a master’s degree in cybersecurity through a program that goes well beyond typical information technology (IT) offerings.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

On Wednesday, Dr. Mohsen Milani's boss came to him with an idea.

USF Provost, Dr. Ralph Wilcox, wanted Milani, the Executive Director of the USF Center for Strategic and Diplomatic Studies, to organize an event focusing on recent events in Ukraine, including Russia's military intervention in Crimea.

"His argument was that as a globally engaged university, it is one of the responsibilities of our university to inform and educate our students as well as the community about important and developing news," Milani said.

So, between USF faculty and Milani's contacts in the world of foreign affairs, he had three experts lined up to take part in a 'campus conversation' Thursday afternoon - barely 26 hours after Wilcox's initial request.

Steve Newborn / WUSF

Charlie Crist has been somewhat quiet on the campaign trail, preferring to hawk his new book rather than take his message to the corners of the state. Today, he campaigned in Tampa for the first time since announcing his candidacy for governor.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

With the war in Afghanistan possibly winding down, at least when it comes to U.S. involvement, but the situation in Syria remaining in question, the timing of a recent conference at the University of South Florida on the nature of warfare was impeccable.

Retired U.S. Army Colonel Derek Harvey is Director of Research and Strategy for USF’s Citizenship Initiative, which organized the conference, “Modern Warfare’s Complexity and the Human Dimension.”

“The purpose of the conference is to bring academics, think tanks, military officials, non-governmental organizations and others together who deal with conflicted societies where conflict exists or might exist, and make sure that we are learning the right lessons from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq,” Harvey said.


USF Health

Dr. Charles Lockwood is changing from a Buckeye to a Bull.

The current Dean of the Ohio State University's College of Medicine has been named the new senior vice president for USF Health and dean of the Morsani College of Medicine.

Lockwood, 59, a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and an internationally known researcher in obstetrics and gynecology, will take the helm at USF on May 5th.

He replaces Dr. Stephen Klasko, who left last September after nine years leading USF Health to become the president of Thomas Jefferson University and president/CEO of the Jefferson University Hospital System.

John O'Connor / WUSF

Wearing black shirts and green ties, members of Sigma Beta Rho fraternity said goodbye to Imtiyaz "Jim" Ilias, Jobin Kuriakose, Ankeet Patel and Dammie Yesudhas Thursday at the University of South Florida.

The four men were killed in a collision early Sunday morning when their car was struck by a driver going the wrong way on Interstate 275.

Family and several hundred USF students were in attendance, many wearing their own Greek letters.

Patel's sister, Krupa, says his fraternity nickname fit.

USF University Communications and Marketing

Good news for broke college students -- which, last time we checked, was every college student. The price of attending the University of South Florida could actually decrease a bit next year.

This morning, the USF Board of Trustees voted to freeze most student fees and lower others, 10 News reports.

Two Wrong-Way Crashes Kill 11 in Florida, California

Feb 10, 2014
USF Sigma Beta Rho

A Ford Expedition was heading south in the northbound lanes of I-275 in Tampa at around two in the morning until it crashed into the car carrying four USF fraternity Sigma Beta Rho students.

The crash left all five dead. Officials know who the Expedition belongs to but haven't confirmed if the owner was the driver. It could take more than a month before officials know if alcohol or drugs played a role in the crash.

Sigma Beta Rho

This Sunday was a tragic day for many, with at least eight people dying overnight in crashes in Hillsborough County. Among them were four young students from the University of South Florida, who perished after their car was struck head-on by a wrong-way driver on Interstate 275, as reported on tbo.com.

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