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USF Marketing Department

Mark Schreiner / WUSF Public Media

If you've ever dined out and wondered why you chose a cheeseburger over the salad, the choice may not have entirely been your own -- you might have been influenced by the music the restaurant was playing. 

That's one of the findings from a study by a University of South Florida researcher. 

Bentley University Observer

Have you ever been tempted by the smell of a bakery? Drawn in by the color of the walls of a restaurant? Or wondered why certain music is being played in a store?

It's called "sensory marketing," a field that USF Associate Professor of Marketing Dipayan Biswas knows a lot about.

“Anything that appeals to our senses are more impactful in sort of influencing our behavior, our choices, and often, it happens at a very subconscious level, so we are not even aware of that,” according to Biswas, the author of a dozen articles and over fifty studies on sensory marketing.

Adam Craig / USF Marketing Dept.

Have you ever seen an advertisement that you just know is wrong, you realize the moment you’re watching it, you’re being lied to?  You know, like the bracelet that promises to make you smarter, more attractive, and lower your cholesterol?

But no matter how outrageous those claims, some people still fall for them. USF Assistant Professor of Marketing Adam Craig is studying how our brains react to advertising—particularly deceptive ads—and he’s using neuroscience techniques to do so.